Types of Visas & Residence Permits in Croatia

If you are not a Croatian citizen and wish to stay in Croatia longer than 90 days (or the tourism period allowed for your nationality), then you’ll need to apply for a long-term residence permit.

There are several types of visas and residence permits available that vary depending on your nationality, heritage and purpose of your stay.

If you are only traveling to Croatia for a short period, you only need a tourist visa.

Tourist Visa

Nationals of certain countries require a visa to enter Croatia, even if only for a short term visit. To see if you need a visa to travel to Croatia, go here. For nationals of these countries, you can apply for a visa online here.

If you plan to stay in Croatia longer than what is allowed for your nationality as a tourist, you’ll need a residence permit.

Croatia Residency in EU

Here is the list of available residence permits in Croatia:

Before going to the Ministarstvo unutarnjih poslova aka “MUP” (police) to apply for a residence permit, make sure you know which permit you qualify for and the requirements for the permit.

EEA Nationals & Their Family

Nationals of EEA Member States and the Swiss Confederation are entitled to a work and residence permit in Croatia. To get the residence permit, they must apply for it no less than 82 days after entry. Here is a list of residence requirements for EEA Nationals and their family members. 

Non-EEA Nationals with Permanent EEA Residence & Their Family

If you do not have citizenship in an EEA member state but do have permanent residence in the EEA, you can apply for residency in Croatia. You’ll need to show your current (not expired) permanent residence, proof of financial support and proof of health insurance.

Highly-Qualified Non-EEA National

This is a new residency regime for Croatia that came into effect with the accession to the EU in July 2013. This program is also referred to as the EU Blue Card.

If you have received higher education or qualifications such as ISCED 1997 levels 5a or higher, or an associate’s degree or higher, you can apply to be a part of the Blue Card network. Once you are verified, employers within the EU are able to hire you. Once you have been hired or given a binding work offer for a highly-qualified position within Croatia, you may apply for a Croatia residence permit that allows you to work.

Everybody Else

If you do not hold EEA citizenship, then you fall into the “everybody else” bucket. For those in this category, you’ve got your work cut out for you. Make sure you bring these items with you to the MUP (police station). The reasons Croatia may grant a residence permit to a non-EEA national are:

  • Family reunification

    This includes reuniting with a spouse or immediately family member who has a valid residence permit or citizenship. Proof of relation must be provided.

  • Secondary school education and university studies

    You’ll need to prove enrollment at a qualifying institution.

  • Scientific research

    Contact the MUP for specific guidelines on how to show purpose of research in Croatia.

  • Humanitarian grounds

    This includes volunteer work. This permit can be valuable to those who have no valid grounds for staying in Croatia. For example, let’s say your boyfriend has a permit to stay in Croatia. You aren’t married, so you can’t apply for a permit under Family Reunification. If he is able to support you with his salary, you can apply to volunteer under this permit scheme. You’ll need to have a contract with an employer or agency for the volunteer work that states you are not being paid.

  • Work

    This is a straight work permit initiated by a Croatian employer, meaning you must have a valid work contract before you can apply for the work permit.

  • Work for other purposes

    This is a generic catchall for other work situations. For example, you could start a Croatian company, then issue yourself a work contract from your own company. This scenario will allow you to apply for a residence permit.

  • Miscellaneous Visa for non-EU Nationals

    A temporary stay (up to a year) may be granted to non-EU nationals without a concrete purpose for the stay. This temporary permit is only for 1 year and requires that you prepay both rent and state health insurance for the entire term of your permit. You must also provide proof of funds to support yourself. This amount can vary drastically and is dictated by the police. They will give you the amount you must have to prove financial stability. Please note that this residence permit is not renewable and does not allow you to work. Here are all the details you need on this residence permit.

For information on the Croatia residence application process and what you need for your permit application, check out our other posts.

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140 thoughts on “Types of Visas & Residence Permits in Croatia

  1. R.B. Allen
    February 3, 2014 @ 7:25 pm

    Hi Sara.  My family and I are currenltly living in Stobrec for the month of February.  My son is attending the tennis camp here.  Currently we live in Chile, so it is summer holiday for us.  We are considering a move to Croatia so that my older son (9) can continue training here.  I have a six-year-old as well.  I am wondering if I could ask you a few questions about the visa process and whether you can recommend a lawyer or if you have any experience with the process.  We have been living outside of the US for over five years (Australia, Chile) so we are familiar with the challenges of expat living.  Kind regards, Becky

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 4, 2014 @ 8:37 am

      Hi Becky – Sure! You can email me directly at [email protected].

       

      {reply}

    • Raphael
      July 12, 2018 @ 8:39 pm

      Hi Sara

      How can I change my tourist visa to temporary resident permit. Also can temporary resident permit allow me to work in Croatia

      {reply}

      • Expat in Croatia
        July 16, 2018 @ 11:21 am

        Hi Raphael,

        You cannot change a tourist visa to a residence permit. You would need to apply for a residence permit. If you are not an EU national or married to one, then the only option for you would be a student permit or a temporary 1-year permit. The temporary 1-year permit will not allow you to work and you must leave after the end of the year.

        Regards,

        Sara

        {reply}

        • Mark
          September 13, 2019 @ 4:21 pm

          Sara – My spouse and I are retired. We just spent 90 days traveling in Croatia. We are US citizens traveling the world looking for another country to settle. Croatia is near the top of our list. We do not need to work, and do not need access to health insurance. We would like to rent a place for 1-2 years before buying a residence. If we had 1 year visa how long would we to leave before we could return? Thank you.

          {reply}

          • Expat in Croatia
            September 16, 2019 @ 1:28 pm

            Hi Mark,

            If you got this permit for one year, you must leave for 18 months before returning again.

            Regards,

            Sara

      • Roop Kaur
        October 5, 2019 @ 4:31 pm

        I am tourist here in Croatia I like Croatia and I want to stay here longer do you have any suggestion for me how can I stay here longer and how can I convert my Visa tourist to work permit.

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          October 9, 2019 @ 3:05 pm

          Hi Roop,

          A short term visa cannot be converted to a work permit. To get a work permit, you will need to first get a contract with a Croatian company. Once you do that, you can follow these instructions to apply for the work permit: https://www.expatincroatia.com/how-apply-work-permit/

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  2. ardea tamraz
    August 11, 2014 @ 2:59 am

     i was born i fiume in 1947 and now live in australia i was wondering if i could move back to reijka to live i do not have a job but i have an australian pension and some money just wonder how much it would cost to rent an live there

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 20, 2014 @ 11:44 am

      Hi Ardea,

      If you hold Croatian citizenship, you can absolutely move back. If you don’t, you’ll need to apply based on your birth. Cost of living will be much lower than Australia. Average rent is between 200 and 400 Euros.

      Hope that helps!

      {reply}

  3. Margot Berry
    September 1, 2014 @ 2:32 pm

    Hi!  My husband and I are both US citizens.  We are currently living temporarily in Germany on study visas but are looking to move more permanently to Croatia.  Do you know if it is possible to get residency by purchasing property in Croatia?  Or do you have to start a business and purchase the property in the business name?  Any info you can provide would be appreciated…  Thanks!

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    • Expat in Croatia
      September 24, 2014 @ 12:08 pm

      Hi Margot,

      The most important thing to consider is do you intend to work in Croatia, e.g. take in Croatian income through a Croatian bank account. Croatia does not currently offer residency through the purchase of property. Essentially, you have two options. The first is to start a company, then hire yourself (or your husband) as the employee and pay the minimum salary requirement. The employee is then entitled to a visa as an employed person in Croatia, and the spouse is entitled to a visa under reunification of the family. The downside to this is you have to spend a great deal of money on setting up the business and ongoing taxes and pension, but it does entitle you to a visa. To give you an idea, the start up capital required for a non-EU national starting a business is 100,000 Croatian Kuna (about 20,000 USD).

      Second option is less guaranteed. You can apply for a visa as an independently financially sufficient person. You’ll need to prove you have a specific amount in your bank account once a year to show you have enough money to live on. Normally this is in the ballpark of 26,000 Croatian Kuna for one individual. The reason this option is less guaranteed is because Croatia still requires some kind of valid reason for living here if you are not an EU national. Non-work related reasons could include education, volunteer work, research, reunification of the family, etc.

      Your best option is to come to Croatia and speak to the immigration office directly. If you explain your situation, they’ll let you know your best option. Since Croatian immigration is still a fairly subjective and manual process, you are more likely to get more leeway if you discuss it with them in person. Once you get the first visa, it’s pretty easy to get it year after year until you reach 5 years at which point you can apply for citizenship if that is the ultimate goal.

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  4. Jack
    April 11, 2016 @ 4:29 pm

    Hi,

    My wife is Croatian.  Do I fall in the EEA Nationals and their family category or the 'everyone else' bucket? 

    Thanks!

    {reply}

    • Sara Expat in Croatia
      April 11, 2016 @ 4:32 pm

      Hi Jack,

      Thanks for reaching out! You would qualify for a visa as a spouse of an EU national. As a spouse of a Croatian, you are afforded additional privileges beyond just a spouse of a non-Croatian (but still EU) national. For example, you would be exempt from having to take the test to gain citizenship.

      {reply}

      • Ajay Sharma
        July 15, 2018 @ 11:37 am

        Hhyy I m Indian I m graduate from HOTEL management can I work in croatia

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          July 16, 2018 @ 11:16 am

          Hi Ajay,

          You can only work in Croatia if you are sponsored (which will be nearly impossible) or you start your own business.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

    • Jo Dukaric
      September 23, 2016 @ 2:12 pm

      Hi. I'm updating my progress with regards to getting a temporary stay visa here in Croatia. Like Jack, my spouse is Croatian and the process so far has been very simple for me probably due to this. When I handed in my documentation (apostille-stamped certificates etc) the clerk just gave them back to me. I assume though that had I not had these (not inexpensive!) documents (with translations) then it would have been a problem, so I just justified the hundreds of dollars spent obtianing/translating them, by telling myself that =) The clerk put a document in front of me and said "Call this number tomorrow", and that was that. Next day I called that number, and the speaker spoke in Croatian so my husband spoke to them. They gave me another telephone number to call, which I did. It was the number of my case manager, who spoke English and was processing my application. I told her that my husband and I were going to the coast for three weeks and if that would be a problem in regards to processing (should I need to attend an interview or whatever in this time), she said "No problem, call me when you return". A few days after we left, the policija visited the apartment to check that I lived there, and fortunately my in-laws were there to feed the cats. The policija were satisfied that I was a resident there. When we returned from our holiday, I called my case manager, and she directed me to visit her as the case was closed from her end. The next day I went to see her. She handed me the application form and said "Why did you only apply for one year?", and I told her that from the information that I gleaned from the internet that a temporary visa lasts for one year, then a reapplication is necessary. She told me to cross out the one year and write five years instead. She said that spouses are auromatically granted five years. She gave me a payment slip to pay for the ID card (240kn) and a letter to take to HZZO when I collect my card (2-3 weeks). Just to note, I did not use my bank account to prove my financials, as I brought my cash with me, because withdrawing funds from international bank accounts can incur exchange rate & foreign bank fees. I exchange funds at the exchange office, where I get a good rate (I always change some when then rate is especially good that day). I then kept the receipt and showed this as proof of subsistence with my application. At the time of handing in my documents, I had about 56,000kn exchanged. I read somewhere that 25,000kn per year is acceptable for subsistence. Don't get too worried about the procedure, it was actually very informal. I didn't have to do anything, such as provide any other documents and I was not interrogated about anything, I was a bit concerned about not having a bank account statement to show them (although I would have just deposited the funds into my husband's bank account if necessary) and I hoped that the recepits from the currency exchange office would be acceptable, and thankfully they seemed to be. Regarding health insurance, because Australia and Croatia do not have reciprocal health care programs, I had to take out travel insurance whilst my application was being processed, so I just used Croatia Osiguranje, for coverage of 3 months. Only when you're application is processed, you apply for ID card and get the OIB number will they then give you the document to take to HZZO. I'm glad that process is over, so much undue worry! If my husband were to come to Australia to stay, it would have been extremely arduous and extremely expensive. Most immy's hire lawyers to do all of the bureaucracy. 

      {reply}

      • Nayoma
        March 8, 2018 @ 7:09 am

        Thanks Jo & Sara for sharing your experience. Now I can organise necessary papers translated before I arrive in Zagreb. I will definitely be in touch with you all during my process. Nayoma

        {reply}

  5. Jo Dukaric
    July 13, 2016 @ 11:28 am

    Thanks for this useful info Sarah. I appreciate the time it takes you to assist visitors and hopeful immigrants like me! My husband is Croatian and lives in Zagreb, and I will be applying for a visa to stay longer than the 90 days. I've worked to save thousands of dollars over the last 10 months (I returned from Croatia in late August) and depart (hopefully permanently) on Saturday WOOOOO for me! 

    {reply}

    • Sara Expat in Croatia
      July 14, 2016 @ 11:00 am

      Hi Jo! Thanks so much for the kind words. Happy to help. 🙂

      Good luck with your visa! If you’re husband is Croatian, you’re in for an easier time than many, thankfully.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Jo Dukaric
        July 26, 2016 @ 5:45 pm

        Thanks so much Sara. Your blog, and also Chasing The Donkey, has been my go-to. I mentioned in another comment thread on your blog about being insured. I'm not sure if this is a new thing but I will add it anyway: before I get the paper from the police to take to HZZO for state insurance, I had to have travel insurance until they actually provide me with that paper. I'm assuming that the paper from the policija that I need for state insurance will be given to me after I've submitted my documentation. I went to Croatia Osiguranje and it cost nearly 1,000kn for 3 months cover. Visa processes are are torment anywhere, but if my husband were to come to Australia to live (which wasn't an option anyway because I love Croatia) it would be much more stressful and very, very expensive. I intend to enrol in the Croaticum langauge course at the uni here in Zagreb. Thanks again Sara!  ????

        {reply}

  6. Ceili
    October 28, 2016 @ 4:44 am

    Hi
     

    I am curious if you know someone who can answer a few questions for me.
     

    I am a Canadian male citizen in my mid 40's.  I am wanting to possibly move to Croatia to live and open a business.  One key reason is because I went threw a very long and messy divorce and see no end to the fighting and restrictions.  I want to move to start life over.  I have no criminal record.  I am a good man with good morals.  I would be a great asset to any business or country.
     

    Please let me know if the Croatian government can help me quickly get my temporary citizenship and then citizenship.
     

    Please let me know
     

    Ceili

    [email protected]

    {reply}

    • Sara Expat in Croatia
      November 7, 2016 @ 11:50 am

      Hi Ceili,

      Thanks for reaching out! If you are a non-EU national, then to get a visa you would need to start a d.o.o. business, invest 100,000 kuna in the business and hire at least 3 Croatians full time to qualify for a visa. As an aside, the Croatian government doesn’t do anything quickly, which is good to understand up front.

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  7. Mike
    December 5, 2016 @ 11:22 pm

    Hi!

    My wife, baby, and I are in Croatia on a 90 day stay due to our U.S passports. I am trying to stay an additional 6 months. Through my research, I was able to find that you can get a temporary residence permit by paying for hotel or apartment for 6 months in full, along with Croatian insurance, and proof of income. Is that accurate?

    thank you!

    {reply}

    • Sara Expat in Croatia
      December 8, 2016 @ 11:30 am

      Hi Mike,

      I’ve heard similiar stories. Honestly, every situation is different and it all depends on who you talk to. The best call is to go into the Policija station and ask. Give them all of your info along with your intention to sign a contract. For proof of income, they will tell you an amount and you’ll need to deposit it into a Croatian bank. The Croatian bank will then issue you a letter to give to the police as proof of your funds. A US bank account (or any other foreign one) will not be sufficient. The first step would be to get an OIB identification number, which you’ll need to sign a lease, get health insurance and begin the extension process. Hope this helps!

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  8. Triston
    January 20, 2017 @ 11:34 am

    Hello Sara:
     

    I've already had one resident permit for three months to attend a Croatian language school, but I am up for renewal at the end of February. They told me that to get a renewal of three months, I would have to enroll in the HZZO. That is not a problem either. The problem is that I would prefer to get a year long permit by volunteering somewhere but I am not sure which organizations do that. I have contacted several but not sure what they do exactly and if I qualify.

    Also, how many times can I renew my permit for 3 months by studying at school? I have shown them proof of income, insurance, have my OIB, and my address is verified. If I want to get an extended permit, what is the best option? I am looking to stay there long-term.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    {reply}

    • Sara Expat in Croatia
      April 6, 2017 @ 10:14 am

      Hi Triston,

      Thanks for reaching out!

      There unfortunately is not an organized list of organizations that offer volunteering opportunities. I do know that some English kindergartens have offered volunteer opportunities for native English speakers.

      You’ll need to speak to the policija in your local jurisdiction to find out how many times you can renew your student visa, as your options may vary depending on the type of school.

      If you are not an EU national, you may be able to get a one-year temporary visa if you prepay your rent and health insurance for one year. Again, you’ll need to speak with your local jurisdiction about this. I know many people who have gone this route, but the policija will not admit it is an option publicly.

      Good luck!

      Sara

      {reply}

  9. Suleiman
    February 15, 2017 @ 10:09 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I read your blog and it seem quite informative and helpful for people moving to Croatia. I am a Pakistan national. I have setup my company in Croatia and have few days back got my approval of the residence and work permit of 1 year from the Ministry of Interior, Police Department in Zagreb. Am confused now as to whether I can travel to Coatia using that approval letter document, or do I need to go to any Croatiian overseas embassy for getting a visa since in Pakistan there is no Embassy or diplomatic representation of Croatia. I don't know what to do next. WIll apprciate if you can help me out!!!

    Thanks,

    Syed. 

    {reply}

    • Sara Expat in Croatia
      April 6, 2017 @ 10:11 am

      Hi Syed,

      Congrats on setting up a company!

      The situation you describe of getting approved for residence outside of Croatia is unusual. If you were approved, they should have given you a visa. I recommend contacting the closest Croatia embassy or consulate that you could physically get to and ask them what your next step should be. You need to get the ID card that is proof of your residence permit.

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  10. Bill
    March 7, 2017 @ 6:08 am

    Hi,

     My wife is Croatian born and we are living on Canada. We are coming over with a six month ticket and the future unclear. If we decide to stay longer than ninety days when do we apply for a visa and am I given any benefits being married to a Croatian for visa?  Do we apply for Health coverage immediately?

    If all goes well for our stay we may relocate,luckily have a free place to stay and a prnsion check deposited monthly…

    {reply}

    • Sara Expat in Croatia
      April 6, 2017 @ 10:08 am

      Hi Bill,

      Thanks for reaching out!

      You should register with the policija right when you arrive, regardless of how long you plan to stay. If you plan to stay longer than 90 days, then begin the visa process in advance of that deadline. Yes, you are entitled to a visa based on your marriage to a Croatian citizen. You’ll need to apply for health coverage as part of your visa process.

      Good luck!

      Sara

      {reply}

  11. Susie
    March 24, 2017 @ 1:51 pm

    Hello,

    I am bollowing up on Mike's question regarding getting a residence permit based on paying for 6 months rent on an apartment/house in full.  Does anyone happen to have any confirmation or experience with this?  I would love to know how everything turned out for Mike.

    Thanks!

    Susie

    {reply}

    • Sara Expat in Croatia
      March 24, 2017 @ 4:55 pm

      Hi Susie,

      Thank you for reaching out! You would need to pay for 12 months of rent and 12 months of health insurance in full to qualify for a 1-year permit.

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  12. Susie
    March 24, 2017 @ 7:54 pm

    Hi Sara,

    Thank you so much for that information.  Is there a name for this type of residence permit?  I am just wondering, when we move, how should I reference it?  As far as the order of things, would I first go to Croatia, locate an apartment, sign a lease and pay for 12 months, get health insurance, and then bring all of this info to the local police station to get a permit?  We are Americans, and do not need a work permit, just residence permits for our family.  Any other details you happen to have would be wonderful.

    Thanks again!

    Susie

    {reply}

  13. Franko
    April 6, 2017 @ 12:36 am

    Hi Sara,

    I'm a Croatian citizen and live outside Croatia with my spouse. We have been married for over 10 years, it is a same sex marriage. Will my spouse be able to move back with me to Croatia to live?

    {reply}

    • Sara Expat in Croatia
      April 6, 2017 @ 10:06 am

      Hi Franko,

      Thanks for reaching out!

      Yes, your spouse can definitely join you in Croatia and will be entitled to a visa based on your marriage. 🙂

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  14. Peter
    April 6, 2017 @ 3:01 am

    Hi,

    I have some questions for Jo Dukaric.  Thanks a lot for your help on this blog.

    1) In which city did you apply?

    2) How long did it take to get your 5-year residence card? (2-3 weeks?)

    3) When you get the paper from the policija to take to HZZO after you get your ID card did they tell you that you are required to do this by law as a condition to have the residence permit?  What did they say exactly about taking the letter to HZZO?  When you went to HZZO did they make you pay a 5000 kuna down payment and then send you bills for 450 kuna per month? 

    Thanks a lot,

    Peter

    {reply}

    • Jo Dukaric
      May 11, 2017 @ 11:30 pm

      Hello Peter, sorry it took long to reply, I just read this! 
      – I applied in Zagreb.

      – After I handed in my documents my husband and I went on a holiday to the coast for three weeks. There was a visit by the policija whilst we were away. When we returned I had to go into the office to speak with my "case manager" who approved everything within a few minutes and gave me a deposit form to pay for the residence card. The card took a couple of weeks to process.

      – They actually didn't mention anything about HZZO to me. I already got my card when I went to the HZZO office and applied for the health care. Yes, there was a 5000kn fee. 

      {reply}

    • Jo Dukaric
      May 11, 2017 @ 11:38 pm

      I should explain, when I went to the policija to tell them I was applying for a temporary stay visa, I asked them about the need for HZZO insurance and how do I apply for it while my application is being processed, what do I need to take to the office. The clerk told me to just go into the office and ask. When I went to HZZO the clerk there told me that I couldn't and to just take out travel insurance, so I did, at Croatia Osiguranje. When I went to hand in all my documents I just showed the clerk the Croatia Osiguranje paperwork, and that seemed to be sufficient.  At no point was HZZO actually mentioned to me, I asked about it.

      {reply}

      • Peter
        May 28, 2017 @ 5:26 pm

        Hi Jo,

        Thanks so much for your help. 

        Peter

        {reply}

      • Nera Komaric
        July 14, 2017 @ 3:48 pm

        Hi Jo,

        Did anyone explain to you why you have to pay 5000 HRK fee to join a national health insurance?

        Thank you.

        Nera

        {reply}

        • Jo Dukaric
          August 13, 2017 @ 7:58 pm

          Hello Nera, apologies for taking so long to reply, as I just read this. No, there was no explanation. I assume it is just in case I would need to access the health care system within the first year and the state isn’t burdened with the cost.

          {reply}

  15. Natasa Luketic
    April 20, 2017 @ 5:19 pm

    Hi Sarah, 

    My husband is croatian and i'm from Mauritius. I would be bringing our newborn son to Croatia in July and was also wondering about the process for staying longer since my son and husband will be staying in croatia. Would i have to apply for a long term visa for my son also??

    Thank you for the blog

    Natacha

    {reply}

    • Sara Expat in Croatia
      May 4, 2017 @ 9:36 am

      Hi Natasa,

      Thanks for reaching out! Both you and your son would need to apply for a visa based on your marriage to a Croatian citizen. You’ll need to have your marriage certificate translated into Croatian, which can be done here. In addition, you’ll need to sign up for national health insurance, get an OIB and provide your passport. Best to speak to the policija in the jurisdiction where you plan to reside. Since you are married to a citizen, it will be an easier process for you.

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  16. Natasa Luketic
    April 26, 2017 @ 6:19 am

    Hello Sara, 

    I am married to a Croatian and we recently had a son. I am planning on coming to croatia along with my son in 3 months. Will i have to apply for an extended for my son also or is it only me who needs a visa. As a citizen of Mauritius i am entitled to stay in Croatia for 90days. 

    Thank you so much for the blog

    Natacha

    {reply}

  17. janet
    May 18, 2017 @ 8:52 pm

    Hi! My husband and I are US residents. My husband is in Croatia on a work Visa. My question is this. I will be joining him next month and staying until November. Do I need a Visa? If so, do I get the Visa before I get there or after?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      July 5, 2017 @ 10:45 am

      Hi Janet,

      Thanks for reaching out! You will need a visa if you plan to stay longer than 90 days. Please note, you MUST register with the Policija upon arrival. If you do not, and end up needing a visa or an extension of your travel visa, you could be denied or at the very least, fined.

      Cheers,
      Sara

      {reply}

  18. Jeylan
    June 11, 2017 @ 7:43 am

    Dear Sara,

    I'm a non-EU who wants to be an Au pair in croatia, and since i have a resident card from romania i can enter and stay in croatia for up to 90 days.

    What kind of visa do you recommend i get? I want to stay there for a year or 9 months minimum. I thought of enrolling in croaticum in their part time program but i don't know the duration of that course (it's called the short 2×2) and if they give student visas for part time classes?

    Thank you in advance!!

    Jeylan

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      July 5, 2017 @ 10:39 am

      Hi Jeylan,

      Thanks for reaching out! I recommend speaking to Croaticum specifically, as they will likely know which programs qualify for residency better. However, the best route would be to come to Croatia and speak with the Policija. There are work restrictions with student visas, so you would need to know if you could be an au pair while on a student visa.

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

    • Jo Dukaric
      August 13, 2017 @ 8:30 pm

      Jeylan, I did the Croaticum p/t course last October. There were students from all around the world doing the course who obtained visas. One of the students in my class was from Romania and he also had a job.

      {reply}

  19. Shan
    July 27, 2017 @ 10:46 am

    Hi Sara!

    I am Asian living in Split, married to Croatian and got my temporary residence ID . In relation to this, I am working in Qatar do I need to come back here in croatia every 6 months as what they say? I went to Policija and have different answers and I dont know what to do . By the way I am leaving this august. So when do I need to come back here so my RESIDENCE ID card will be VALID ? If I will come back here more than 6 months is my residence card will be still valid in immigration ?

    Please HELP!

    Thanks to you! More Power!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 3, 2017 @ 3:12 pm

      Hi Shan,

      Thanks for reaching out!

      If you are married to a Croatian and have residency based on your marriage, then you do not have to leave. You are entitled to temporary residence for 6 years, then permanent residence for 2 years after that, then can apply for citizenship after 8 years.

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

    • Jo Dukaric
      August 13, 2017 @ 8:36 pm

      Hello Shan, just to extend on what Sara explained, I actually read that in order for the visa to be valid for it’s duration, you can’t be out of Croatia for any longer then 6 months in that duration. So, if you leave for longer then 6 months you will have to reapply.

      {reply}

      • Peter
        March 29, 2018 @ 2:08 am

        Hi Jo,
        Thanks for your comment. Where did you read that you can’t be out of Croatia for longer than 6 months for your residence permit to be valid? In the 1-year temporary visa section (which is not really my category anyway) I have read that for gaining permanent residence or citizenship you can’t be out of the country more than 6 months in a 5 year period, but I have not found anywhere on any official site any mention that being out of the country more than 6 months will invalidate a 5 year temporary residence permit. Anyway, pointing me to where you read this would be of great help.
        Thanks,
        Jack

        {reply}

  20. Linda
    September 6, 2017 @ 10:32 pm

    Hello Sara,
    My husband and I are American citizens currently living in the Middle East. We visited Croatia and would love to buy a vacation property there to rent when we are not using it personally with the idea of retiring in Croatia either full or part time in a few years.

    1. Is it possible to buy and then offer to rent property if you are non-EU citizens?

    2. Would this constitute setting up a business for the purpose of obtaining a visa later so we could stay more than 90 days out of 180 days and also to obtain medical coverage?

    Thank you in advance for any help you can provide!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 7, 2017 @ 10:51 am

      Hi Linda,

      Thanks for reaching out!

      1. Yes, you may purchase and then rent the property even if you are a non-EU citizen.

      2. You are entitled to a visa if you purchase residential property, so you shouldn’t need to start a business to get a visa.

      I recommend contacting a real estate and immigration attorney. I know a great one. If you email me at [email protected], I can provide a referral.

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  21. Mike Wong
    October 18, 2017 @ 8:55 am

    Hi Sara,

    My husband and I are Singaporean citizens. I bought a house in Dalmatia back in 2002, and we’ve been going back to Croatia since then. Now my retirement will be coming in 5 years, and I am thinking about spending more than 90 days per year in beautiful Croatia.

    My understanding is that the property ownership does not automatically grants you a temporary residence permit. I am prepared to start a company if it is absolutely necessary (probably a small tour operator targeting Asian clients), but it would be better if we won’t have to work or go through complicated procedure of establishing and running the company.

    We will have enough pension to survive in Croatia (roughly around 2,500 Euro per month), and I have saving of around 500,000 Euro, part of which can be deposited to my Croatian bank account if necessary.

    What would be your recommendation in this case?

    Best regards,
    Mike

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      October 18, 2017 @ 9:00 am

      Hi Mike,

      Thanks for the question!

      Actually, you can qualify for a residence permit based on your purchase of a residential property. I recommend consulting with an immigration lawyer. If you would like a recommendation, please contact me directly.

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Mike Wong
        October 18, 2017 @ 9:40 am

        Dear Sara,

        Thanks for your prompt reply.

        I was pleasantly surprised to find out that purchase of a residential property can actually serve as a ground for temporary permit.
        When I checked with the website of the Croatian Ministry of Interior, the Ministry only lists the following as grounds:

        1. family reunification
        2. secondary school education and university studies
        3. scientific research
        4. humanitarian grounds work
        5. work of posted workers or for other purposes

        Is there possibility that Croatia already changed the regulation for third country national property owners? If not, do you think Croatia will change the regulation when it enter the Shengen regime?

        Best regars,
        Mike

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          October 18, 2017 @ 9:53 am

          Hi Mike,

          The Ministry web site list is incomplete. I personally know people who have received residence permits in the last year based on purchasing residential property. This is the best route for you to pursue.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  22. Mike Wong
    October 18, 2017 @ 10:13 am

    Hi Sara,

    Thank you so much for this valuable information. You made my day!

    I will definitely have to contact you for further advice when I will take concrete steps.

    Thanks once again.

    Mike

    {reply}

  23. susan
    December 26, 2017 @ 9:32 am

    Hi,

    My husband and I belong to India and my husband will be visiting Croatia for a 3 months on work permit.
    I have the following question:
    1. I am planning to visit croatia for a short span of 2 weeks once my husband starts his work in croatia. During my stay in croatia am i eligible to find a job in croatia and apply for a work permit?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      December 26, 2017 @ 11:37 am

      Hi Susan,

      Thank you for your question!

      Unfortunately, it is unlikely you could find a job in Croatia. For non-EU nationals, you must be sponsored by an employer to work in Croatia. Sponsorship of a foreigner is very expensive for the company, so it is rare that a foreigner will be offered a permit unless they are highly specialized and the company cannot fill the position within Croatia.

      In addition, most jobs require some level of fluency in Croatian.

      If your husband were staying longer in Croatia, you could apply for a residency permit which “may” allow you to work. Only three months is not long enough to justify applying for residency, since 90 days is the length of time people can travel to Croatia without a permit of any kind.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  24. Claire
    February 27, 2018 @ 11:52 am

    Hi,

    I have been with my boyfriend for coming on 3 years and we used to work on cruise ships together. I have been to Croatia on a 15 day vacation with him and he has been to South Africa to do the same in between our contracts.
    I have recently stopped working on the ship so that we can focus more on us and making more serious decisions regarding our life together. How would I go about visa application if I am to stay in Croatia for a longer period of time as I do not feel our relationship should be pushed immediately to a marriage just for visa purpose in order to stay together. We want the same opportunity for the natural course of our relationship but as both our countries require visas for one or the other this is made difficult. Any advice on visas and what is the best to apply for in this case?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 27, 2018 @ 3:21 pm

      Hi Claire,

      Thank you for the question!

      I assume based on your situation that your boyfriend is Croatian. If he is, you could try applying for residency based on your cohabitation even if you aren’t married. You will most likely need to prove that you have been together for a while and you’ll definitely need to reside at the same address in Croatia. I know people who have been successful in doing this.

      Another option is this visa: https://www.expatincroatia.com/non-eu-nationals-can-live-croatia-1-year/ You could go this route, then if your relationship gets more serious and you want to stay in Croatia longer than a year, you could then apply for residency under cohabitation.

      Good luck!

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  25. SV
    March 4, 2018 @ 11:17 am

    Hello there! 🙂

    I have recently been issued a Croatian visa valid for 20 days with a duration of stay of 5 days.

    My primary purpose to travel to Croatia is business however I want to stay an extra day beyond 5 days for sightseeing. Is that possible? Can I request for duration of stay extension at immigration ?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 4, 2018 @ 11:35 am

      Hi SV,

      Thanks for the question!

      You should go to the main police station in the jurisdiction where you’ll be staying and request to extend your stay. That being said, if you have a visa valid for 20 days but you are only planning to use 6 days of the 20 days, you shouldn’t need to extend your stay. Unless I’ve misunderstood?

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  26. Sruti Chakraborty
    March 21, 2018 @ 10:29 am

    Hi Sara,

    I have recently received a contractual job offer from a Croatian company. My contract duration is four months and I wish to stay for 15-20 days for sightseeing. Here are my questions:

    1. What kind of visa should I apply for? Employment (work) or Business?
    2. If my country of entry and exit in EU is Croatia itself, then using my Schengen visa which other countries can I visit (given primary visa is for Croatia)?

    I shall be very grateful for your advice.

    Best,
    Sruti

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 21, 2018 @ 11:57 am

      Hi Sruti,

      Thank you for the question!

      Under traditional residency permit rules, you would need to be sponsored by the Croatian company to qualify for a temporary residency permit as a non-EU national. You should speak to the company for which you have a contract and the local police about your situation.

      Your residency permit, should you get one, is for Croatia only. When traveling within Schengen, you’ll travel on your passport, so the rules for your nationality in each country will apply.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  27. Edgars
    April 18, 2018 @ 2:47 pm

    Thank you for the information. Very helpful information for anyone who wants to relocate to Croatia.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      April 30, 2018 @ 3:44 pm

      Thank you Edgars!

      {reply}

  28. Sue
    May 6, 2018 @ 4:57 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I am living in Croatia on a one year temporary stay permit based on having a one year apartment lease (which falls under the “other” category. As I was beginning to prepare for my renewal, I informed that this type of permit is not renewable year to year, and that I would need to wait 6 months after it expires before applying for a new permit. So, I’m brainstorming about other options and it seems from what I have read here that I could pursue a volunteer opportunity, but when I asked a lawyer he didn’t seem to think so. He said that that in order to get a stay and work permit based on volunteer work that I would need to be employed as a volunteer by a foreign association which is registered in Croatia. Do you have any guidance at all about how to actually pursue a volunteer opportunity here in Croatia that would allow me to get a one year permit? Do you know of anyone who has taken this route? I’m in desperate need of some advice.

    Thanks!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      May 29, 2018 @ 1:41 pm

      Hi Sue,

      Thank you for the question!

      I do know people who have received a residence permit based on volunteer work. They secured a contract with a Croatian business as a volunteer with no salary, or at least that is what the contract stated. They were both paid under the table for their time. The volunteer permits must be renewed every year. Keep in mind that a volunteer permit has limits. You most likely would not qualify for permanent residency based on volunteer work.

      Best bet is to target businesses you are qualified to work for and propose a volunteer arrangement. You will need an official contract from the business to provide to the police that includes the term and salary (which would equal zero).

      Hope that helps! Good luck!

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  29. Orris
    May 7, 2018 @ 10:23 am

    Thanks for the article. Very informative

    {reply}

  30. Shamell
    May 14, 2018 @ 10:16 pm

    Hi,

    Even this question was already asked, but nobody reply on it till end, I would like to share my case.

    I am Croatian citizen and my husband is Indian. Now we both live in India. We are in marriage for 2 years and next year we are planning to apply for temporary residence visa and shift to Croatia.

    The thing which is confusing me are conditions about staying or leaving country once temporary visa is given.

    My husband is working in Qatar on offshore-petrol rig. His scedule is 21 days off and 42days on the rig. So my question is will he be able to get temporary staying and continue work in Qatar, or because of his job he wont get it?

    About permanent staying I saw there are conditions, but about temporary visa I didnt saw anywhere what are the conditions of leaving country.

    Thank you,
    Shamell

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      May 29, 2018 @ 1:15 pm

      Hi Shamell,

      Thank you for reaching out!

      The conditions on leaving the country can vary and are unfortunately not set in stone or clear. Typically, non-Croatian citizens must not leave Croatia for more than 30 days each year to keep their residency. That being said, there can be leeway for employment and family. When applying for residency, let the police know about his work schedule. My informed guess is that it won’t be a problem as long as he notifies the police of his work schedule, but best ask the police to be sure.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  31. Wallace
    May 28, 2018 @ 12:26 pm

    Hi Sara,

    Really appreciate your useful articles. Regarding the category “Highly-Qualified Non-EEA National,” would you please specify the definition of “higher education?” Does a mater degree fall into this category?

    I am from Taiwan and had visited Croatia once back in 2014; Croatia becomes my dreamland since then. I got a master degree in the U.S. and have been working as a product manager in tech area for over 7 years. After reading your article, I wonder if I want to acquire a long-term visa in Croatia the only ways are to: a). purchase a residential property in Croatia, or b). get a work visa (which is very rare). I wonder if I can try the “Highly-Qualified Non-EEA National” category. Would you please give me some advice? Thank you very much.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      May 29, 2018 @ 12:00 pm

      Hi Wallace,

      Thank you for the question!

      The “highly qualified non-EEA national” residence permit is for when a Croatian company wants to hire a highly qualified individual because they cannot find someone with the same skills in Croatia. This means it must be tied to an offer from a Croatian company.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  32. Wallace
    May 29, 2018 @ 5:20 pm

    Hi Sara,

    Thank you for your prompt response. I would like to know further details about getting visa via purchasing residential property. Would you please provide more details? Appreciate your reply in advance.

    {reply}

  33. Natalia
    June 18, 2018 @ 11:20 pm

    Hi Sara,

    First, thank you for all the work you put into this project! This is the best and most up-to-date place where I could find answers to a lot of questions I had.

    Here is one I couldn’t find the answer – I was reading somewhere that if you buy a house in Croatia, then all you have to do to get temporary residence beyond one year is to show that you have enough funds to support yourself and get a health insurance. Have you seen that? If yes, is there a number for how much the minimum price for the property should be?

    Thank you!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 23, 2018 @ 1:53 pm

      Hi Natalia,

      Thank you for following!

      To answer your question, it depends on where you are from. EU citizens can purchase property, but there are limitations. Non-EU nationals cannot purchase property and get a permit. This used to be the case, but not anymore.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  34. Andres Aparicio
    July 15, 2018 @ 9:39 pm

    Hello everyone
    I am from colombia south america and I would like to know if there is feasibility to move to croatia with family group, my wife and my two children, we are professionals in our country, businessman and bacteriologist both with specializations, we have no knowledge if it is posibe or viable to initiate some program

    I would appreciate any information
    thank you

    {reply}

  35. Amber Hosack
    July 16, 2018 @ 10:50 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I am currently looking at relocating to Split from the United States and wanted to get some information regarding a temporary stay visa. We were hoping to relocate within 3-6 months if that was possible. Do you have a contact that will do the paper work for us? Should we use an attorney? If so, do you have a recommendation?

    Our details:

    I currently have a boyfriend that has dual citizenship with Croatia and USA. He was born in Croatia and grew up in the United States. We have two children together- ages 1 and 2- that were born in the USA. He is moving to Croatia with our 2 children, and I would like to move there as well. I have 2 children (ages 3 and 5) from a prior relationship that would be moving with me. My ultimate goal would be to stay permanently in Croatia with our family. My boyfriend has several family members with homes there, and we would stay with them for the first couple of months to a year. I have US citizenship only and so do my children.

    I was wondering what the process would be for me to apply for a temporary stay visa? Would you recommend family reunification? Do we qualify for family reunification without being married?

    Thanks in advance for all your help.

    Kind Regards,
    Amber

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      July 17, 2018 @ 10:51 am

      Hi Amber,

      Yes, family reunification would be your best option. Even though you are not married, you do have children together, which will help with your case. If your boyfriend has not already, he should apply for citizenship and passports for the two children you share.

      Yes, I can recommend an immigration attorney in Split. Please email me for that contact.

      Good luck!

      Sara

      {reply}

  36. Danis
    July 26, 2018 @ 3:28 pm

    Hi there

    I am married with croatian citizen.I am from Turkey and we are working together in usa.How can i get my eu residents card.
    Thanks

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 4, 2018 @ 11:55 am

      Hi Danis,

      You would both need to move to Croatia and live at the same address. Only then would you be able to apply for a residence permit as a spouse.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  37. Maria
    July 30, 2018 @ 7:03 pm

    Hello. My name is Maria, and first time i come.in Croatia was 03.2015. In 2016 i request my visa, but i didnt make it, so in 2017 i got married. Now, almost 2 years, we broke up. I am working, i rent some apartament. My question is, i have right to live in croatia after divorce? I live here for 4 years, and i come from third country world. I dont want to move from here.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 4, 2018 @ 12:02 pm

      Hi Maria,

      I recommend you speak to the police. If you are married to an EU national while living in Croatia, and then you divorce, you can be entitled to continue living here if you meet certain requirements. Last I heard, you had to be living in Croatia and married for more than 3 years. You will need to prove you can financially support yourself. You’ll essentially have to show proof of divorce and re-reapply for temporary residency, which will be valid until the end of your current permit. After your current permit expires, you can apply for new residency but as a third-party national, which requires employment with a Croatian company.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  38. Peter in Zagreb
    August 16, 2018 @ 4:13 pm

    Hello, thank you for the information. I am here on a 3 month tourist visa. I just want to extend 3 months for some therapy here. Is there a different process for just a 3 month extension?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 16, 2018 @ 4:37 pm

      Hi Peter,

      Thanks for following!

      You’ll need to go to the MUP office in Zagreb and show cause for the extension, which in this case is your therapy. They will let you know at that time if they require any additional materials.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  39. Peter
    August 22, 2018 @ 6:52 am

    ok thank you very much. Is there a specific station i should go to in Zagreb? Usually I thought would find some immigration office not police office?

    Thank you.

    Peter

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 24, 2018 @ 11:47 am

      Hi Peter,

      Go to the station at Matice Hrvatske 4 and proceed to the Stranci desk/office. In Croatia, immigration goes through the Ministry of Police.

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  40. ES
    August 24, 2018 @ 1:52 am

    Hi, nice article, short and precise.
    I will be entering Croatia on a normal entry visa. I did not see any “student” visas other than a normal type C entry. Also, where I stay we only have a visa center here, and not an embassy. They do make type C visas, they said, but not “student visas”. They weren’t very helpful at all and offered no assistance, and we have no embassy here for me to get official and proper information.

    As far as I understand, I enter Croatia on type C visa, after which I apply for a residence permit during my visa validity.

    Now, question is, can I change ANY type C visa to a residence permit once I enter Croatia and bring my university acceptance documentation and registration? Or is there some special student visa required to enter Croatia which is the only type that can be converted to a permit?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 24, 2018 @ 11:40 am

      Hi ES,

      Thank you for the question!

      You cannot change from one visa to another. That’s not how it works in Croatia. You first enter on a tourist visa, then you may apply for a residence permit. If you are going to be a student, then you would apply for residence based on your enrollment as a student. Go to the MUP station in the city where you plan to attend school with proof of enrollment to start your residence application. They will give you the list of items required for approval.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • ES
        August 30, 2018 @ 5:06 pm

        Hello,
        You are so helpful – much more than the embassy here 🙂 First of all, thank you very much.
        My question was more of whether I need to apply for some “student” visa or whether I can “convert” my tourist visa to temporary residence (1 year I believe) based on my enrollment.

        I.e. some countries will not let you apply for temporary residence if you entered as a tourist.
        Hence my question.

        So therefore I get a normal tourist visa for say, three weeks… then within first week bring all papers to local MUP saying that I need to stay in the country for studies. Did I get you right?

        {reply}

        • ES
          August 30, 2018 @ 10:13 pm

          Oh, I forgot to mention I am a non-EU applicant. Is entering on , say, 3 weeks tourist visa and applying for residency an option? Getting conflicting information everywhere..

          {reply}

  41. Marina
    August 25, 2018 @ 1:02 pm

    Hi,
    Couldn’t see my question covered in comments so far.
    I have dual citizenship (Australian and Croatian).
    I entered Croatia using my Croatian passport and plan to stay longer than 90 days.
    I am staying in a family member’s apartment.
    Do i still need to register my stay with the MUP? I wasn’t sure since i didn’t enter using my Australian passport.

    Many thanks in advance.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 25, 2018 @ 1:32 pm

      Hi Marina,

      Everyone (including Croatian citizens and long-term residents) must be registered with the police.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  42. Vickie Brennan
    October 4, 2018 @ 5:38 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I found a couple documents in English on the Ministry of Finance website. Thought you may want to add them.

    http://www.porezna-uprava.hr/HR_OIB/Documents/oib%20dokumentacija%20-en%20(2).pdf
    http://www.porezna-uprava.hr/en/EN_obrasci/Documents/PINrequest.pdf

    Cheers!
    Vickie

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      October 22, 2018 @ 10:37 am

      Hi Vickie,

      Thanks! The first link didn’t work, but I added the second link to the posts on how to get an OIB. They didn’t use to have an English version of the application, only Croatian. This is a nice addition. 🙂

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  43. Zakaria
    October 5, 2018 @ 11:40 am

    Hello Sara
    I am Algerian and living in Qatar I want to study in university in Croatia I am asking if I am accepted by the university it is allowed for me to take my wife with during the study or not by my charge
    Regards
    Zakaria

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      December 11, 2018 @ 1:06 pm

      Hi Zakaria,

      Yes, you should be able to take your spouse with you. You’ll need to provide the police with a official translation of your marriage certificate, which you should get in Croatia.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  44. Priya
    October 6, 2018 @ 10:22 pm

    Dear Sara ,

    I am an Indian and I want to move to Croatia for good.
    What are my options.
    If I want to start my own business how much is the minimum investment?
    Thanks very much for your time and effort.

    {reply}

  45. alva
    October 31, 2018 @ 3:26 pm

    hello i want to come for volunteer in craotia how can i get a visa or which kind of visa i can ask for

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      December 11, 2018 @ 1:02 pm

      Hi Alva,

      There is a volunteer residence permit. That is what you should apply for. To apply, you’ll need a valid volunteer contract with a Croatian business.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  46. Clair O Brien
    November 17, 2018 @ 3:15 pm

    Hello, I tried posting this before so apologies if my queries show twice! Thanks so much in advance.
    Im an Irish Passport holder, considering moving to the Split area. I have some questions please :

    – Do I need to apply for a 1 year temporary stay visa or am I simply registering for temporary residence with the Police before 3 months has passed?

    I plan on staying for at least a year, not working in Croatia.

    -Is it enough for me to say that I want to stay on simply to enjoy the country and travel the region a bit when asked as to my intention in staying?

    -At what point if any do the Police ask questions about my tax status or have requirements about my paying into the tax system in Croatia? I will not be working in Croatia.

    – Is it typical to have to pay rent upfront a year in advance? I read about a Canada passport holder that was required to do that for their 1 year temp. residency application.

    – Will the Police ask me about my sufficient funds and at what point? I can show for example a payment of minimum €1,000+ every month that goes into Payoneer (like PayPal).

    I understand I may have to deposit funds in a Croatian bank account if asked to demonstrate sufficient funds. When would that be and how much is typically required from them? I read that the figure is 2.000 kn per single individual per month and to have to deposit one years worth of that monthly amount. So, roughly €3228 which is 2,000 x 12. Is this correct?

    Lastly, my car is more than 7 years old. It has Spanish license plates. I read that its very expensive to change plates and anyway they wont for cars more than 7 years old.

    Thanks so much in advance. I will gladly donate in thanks for your assistance. I tried the Irish Consulate but got no where.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      December 11, 2018 @ 12:50 pm

      Hi Clair,

      Since you are an Irish citizen, the process is much simpler for you as an EU national. You should register with the police as soon as you arrive and start your application for residency. You do not need to pay for rent upfront for a year as an EU national. You will need to put 2,000 x 12 (24000 kuna) in a Croatian bank account to show the police. You won’t be able to open a Croatian bank account until you’ve registered an address and started your residency application with the police.

      I’m not sure if you can import your car or not. I’ll do some digging and will let you know if I am able to confirm.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  47. Guillermo Rollero
    December 20, 2018 @ 11:53 am

    Hi Sara
    O hace 66 Yeats los,Argentina nacionalista,Ir I buy a Boston forma turístico Rent,can,I hace a longitud terminar visa?
    Regates Guillermo

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 10, 2019 @ 3:18 pm

      Hi Guillermo,

      Can you clarify your question?

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  48. rohit
    January 14, 2019 @ 6:48 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I am an Indian national and have been offered a job by a croatian employer however the scenario he has explained is quite difficult for me to understand. He states that he will offer me work permit to receive visa and upon my arrival in Croatia, my stay(resident permit) will be applied. the confusing part of me is that employer states that i will be posted to work in germany basis of the “A1″ resident permit that is issued by the croatian immigration ? As per my knowledge, croaitan resident permit will not be valid in schengen area except of bulgaria and Romania so could you please share your views on ‘A1” resident permit issued by immigration of Croatia and also whether we are allowed to travel to schengen countries with this A1 resident card?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 8, 2019 @ 11:59 am

      Hi Rohit,

      I’m not familiar with the A1 resident card or German immigration. I would take your work contract to a Croatian consulate and speak to them.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  49. Annisa
    January 15, 2019 @ 6:30 pm

    Hi Sara

    I am Indonesian and will be working in Croatia this May but I’m still confused about the documents that I need as in a website is not available even in the internet is so hard to find the information.
    I have emailed the Embassy and they said i can apply the visa upon the Embassy receive work permitt from the Ministry of Interior of the Republic of Croatia done by The Croatian Company (where I applied)
    So could you give me any further step and information?

    Thank you

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 8, 2019 @ 11:58 am

      Hi Annisa,

      When you say you will be working in Croatia, does that mean you already have a job lined up with a company that will sponsor you?

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  50. Hugo
    February 13, 2019 @ 2:08 am

    I spent three months in Croatia in 2006 and loved it. I didn’t get a visa. I just rented an apartment for three months and that was it. I plan on going again for a 6-month stay this spring. It seems like a lot of trouble to apply for residency for a 6-month stay although I’m concerned about how the government would react to a non-EU individual (I’m a US citizen) living there without a visa or health insurance (although I’m looking into travel insurance, but I don’t know if Croatian hospitals take that). Do you know any short-term residents in Croatia with similar concerns?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 19, 2019 @ 11:29 am

      Hi Hugo,

      Yes, I’m sure there are people who overstay. I don’t recommend doing it. If you’re caught, you could be fined or banned from coming back for 18 months.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  51. Chris
    February 22, 2019 @ 4:07 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I am a South African Passport holder in my 60’s and have the opportunity to stay in my brothers house near Split at no cost, besides paying for water, lights and rates and taxes.
    Which process do I need to follow to get an annual visa and can I do it as a retiree, able to support myself without having to work.
    Would I be able to start a business?

    Your advice will be greatly appreciated.

    Regards

    Chris

    {reply}

  52. Catherine
    March 12, 2019 @ 11:24 am

    Hi Sara,

    I am an Australian citizen. I visited Croatia last year and loved the country. Due to the time zone requirement of my current work (self-employed), I really wish to stay in Croatia for longer than 90 days out of 6 months and save less travel back and forth. I would love to buy a residential property in Croatia so that I have my own place to stay when I’m in the country for several months.

    1. Is it possible for an Australian citizen to buy a residential property in Croatia?

    2. If yes, will I be entitled to temporary residence?

    Thank you in advance for your help and time!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 19, 2019 @ 10:54 am

      Hi Catherine,

      Yes, you may purchase property but it will not entitle you to temporary residence automatically. I recommend hiring a lawyer, as that will give you the best chance of getting residence based on the purchase. If you email me, I can recommend one.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  53. Mirza Sarhan
    March 21, 2019 @ 10:30 pm

    Hello Sara,

    I hope you are doing well. I truly appreciate how you have been helping all the Expats with their queries. I have a few questions in my mind and if you can write back to me, it would be truly helpful.

    1. I have a temporary resident permit as a volunteer in Croatia for 1 year. I wanted to know if I can travel to my home country and enter Croatia again as I have the temporary resident permit keeping in mind that the travel is for 15 days?

    2. During my stay as a volunteer, I got a job by a Croatian company and we have signed the necessary contract. Hence I will have to apply for a work permit. As I already have a temporary resident permit as a volunteer, will I have to submit all the needed documents again or just the new contracts between me and the employer to upgrade my stay permit to a working one?

    3. If you decide to apply for a change of residence address because you are moving to a new place, how long do you have to report the local police regarding the change of address?

    If you can guide me with these questions, it would be truly helpful!

    Thank you.

    Warm Regards,
    Mirza

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 22, 2019 @ 10:21 am

      Hi Mirza,

      Thank you for following!

      Here are some answers:

      1. Yes, you may travel outside Croatia and return to Croatia considering that you have a residency permit.

      2. You will need to create a brand new application for the work permit. Yes, you’ll need to resubmit certain documents for this. I just did a post on applying for a work permit: https://www.expatincroatia.com/how-apply-work-permit/

      3. You should notify the police of the change immediately.

      Hope that helps!

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  54. Deborah Guarneros
    June 12, 2019 @ 1:58 am

    Hi Sara,

    Thanks for the info that you provide in this website.
    I am Mexican and married a Croatian man past year, we would like to live 7 months in México and 5 months in Croatia, the problem is that I can only stay 3 months in Croatia with the tourist visa.
    We were thinking to apply for the resident visa for me so I can stay more than 3 months, but my husband asked to a friend that married a Vietnamese woman and he told him that she needs to stay at least 6 months in Croatia for 5 years in order to get the resident visa.
    I read your blog post “How spouses of Croatians can apply for residence” and it says that sometimes you can get the 5 years permit or 1 year permit, but it doesn’t say if you need to stay some certain amount of months once you get the permit. Is it possible to stay only 5 months when you get the permit? Are we going to be able to travel to other countries when the permit is in process?

    Thank you a lot!

    Kind Regards,

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 13, 2019 @ 8:43 am

      Hi Deborah,

      Once you receive the permit, you must be in Croatia 11 months out of each year to qualify for permanent residency after 5 years. If you do not intend to apply for permanent residency, then you still need to be in Croatia at least 6 months of each year to keep your residency.

      You may be able to get a short term extension to the tourist visa since you are the spouse of a Croatian without applying for residency, but it would be up to the police station where you plan to stay. They have discretion when it comes to situations like this. It never hurts to ask!

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  55. dan
    June 25, 2019 @ 9:12 pm

    Hi,

    Thanks for all the great info on here!

    I have a question regarding registering as a foreign national in Croatia as an eu citizen for a short stay.

    The mvep.hr website states that “Nationals of EEA Member States or the Swiss Confederation who are entitled to stay in Croatia for up to 3 months from the date of entry into Croatia, if they possess a valid travel document or personal ID” are exempt from registering. would you say this means all eea/eu nationals are exempt?

    I’m asking as I will be visiting Croatia for a week and staying with my partners family, so if necessary would need to register with the police as opposed to a hotel doing it for me.

    Thanks again

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 26, 2019 @ 2:47 pm

      Hi Dan,

      If you are an EU national and only here a week, then you don’t need to register. That being said, your accommodation will do it for you regardless.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • dan
        June 26, 2019 @ 5:47 pm

        Amazing, Thank you!!

        I looked everywhere for clarification to no avail.

        thank you again for your help.

        {reply}

  56. Frank
    June 26, 2019 @ 10:08 pm

    Hi Sara

    I’m visiting Croatia on a tourist visa and a friend in Croatia is allowing me to stay in his place while he is on holiday. I am a non-Eu citizen from South Africa.
    I sent my friend the letter of invitation and guarantee he needs to fill in. I am providing proof of my own subsistence funds. He is merely allowing me to stay in his flat. From reading the guidelines my friend needs to have the letter “Notarized”.
    I understand that is going to the local council office or police station and signing the document in front of them and they stamp it. Is this correct?

    Lastly he won’t have time to lodge the letter with the embassy but if he sends me the document and I enclose it with my visa application at my application center. This shouldn’t be a problem right?
    I understand the last question is a tricky one but hey.

    Thanks in advance.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      July 4, 2019 @ 9:33 am

      Hi Frank,

      By “notarized”, it means it must be validated and stamped by a “javni biljeznik”, which is what a notary is called in Croatia. Then you can provide it to the police.

      Ultimately, it is up to the police if they will accept it. Just make you get a couple copies of the notarized letter to be safe.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  57. Kristian
    August 12, 2019 @ 10:03 am

    Hi Sara,

    When applying for the visa in my country, will they know about “Miscellaneous Visa for non-EU Nationals” or we are supposed to apply for Tourist visa, and than ask for temporary permit for 1 year once we come to Croatia? Is it 100% sure that we don’t need to have any good reason (which is usually a requirement by law, eg family reunification, work, etc.)?

    {reply}

  58. Holly
    August 15, 2019 @ 8:05 pm

    Hi Sara,

    Regarding the part about “Non-EEA Nationals with Permanent EEA Residence & Their Family”, what kind of residency one can apply under this category? (i.e. temporary residence or something else?) Can s/he work AND stay with this kind residency? It seems that the official web says PR holder of EU can only apply for temporary residency (cite from http://www.mvep.hr/en/consular-information/stay-of-aliens/granting-stay-in-croatia-/) which is valid for only 1 year and need to be renewed each yearm while DO NOT working in Croatia is NOT permitted with this. If so, does that mean s/he needs to apply yet another working permit after applying this residency? Is there a credible official source where I can find this specific info?

    Thank you!!

    {reply}

  59. Emmanuel
    September 10, 2019 @ 1:08 am

    Hi , my daughter is a Croatian citizen, she was born in Ireland and mother is also Croatian citizen we are all living in Ireland . Can I also get Croatian residency on that base ? Am from non EEA country

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 11, 2019 @ 11:21 am

      Hi Emmanuel,

      You qualify for citizenship if your parent or grandparent is a Croatian citizen.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  60. Stephen Bleach
    October 1, 2019 @ 7:30 pm

    Just found your site which is amazing. My wife and I are UK citizens and for nearly 10 years now we have based our boat in Croatia cruising this beautiful country. Currently, we spend considerably more than the 90 days in 180 which would presumably apply once the UK becomes a 3rd country. We have a yearly berth contract with ACI Milna on Brac. Could we use this to get an extended visa and is there any precedent you know of? Typically we take 4 trips of from 2 -6 weeks duration from April to October. Very many thanks in advance

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      October 4, 2019 @ 10:20 am

      Hi Stephen,

      Thanks for following!

      I’ve not heard of a situation such as yours where they have granted residency. That being said, since you are UK nationals, you should apply for residency as soon as possible before Brexit. EU residents are granted 5-year residence permits automatically, which would cover these extended stays.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

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