How to apply for citizenship in Croatia

Citizenship in Croatia is an elusive golden goose. For the non-EU nationals, it is Mount Everest, which is an appropriate analogy since such a small fraction of people who even try make it to the summit. By the time they make it, they are certainly weak, beaten down and possibly near death.

I’m not going to mince words here. If you do not have Croatian heritage or are married to a Croatian, it is highly unlikely you will ever qualify to even apply for citizenship.

To be even clearer, do not move to Croatia thinking that you’ll be able to get citizenship one day. Every day, the government is changing laws to prevent foreigners from achieving permanent residency, which is a mandatory requirement for applying for citizenship.

Before you ask, I do not have special powers to get you around any requirements, I don’t know anyone at the Ministry, and I don’t have any secrets to getting through the system other than expressing the importance of kindness, patience and a calm demeanor.

Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, here is how the chosen few can apply for citizenship in Croatia.

Identify Your Valid Claim

To apply for citizenship in Croatia, you must prove that you have a claim. You may make a valid claim based on the following situations:

  • Origin
  • Lineage
  • Naturalization
  • Special Interest to Croatia
  • International treaties

We will now go through each one.

Citizenship Based on Origin

The following groups of people may have or request citizenship on the grounds of origin:

  • People whose parents at the time of their birth were Croatian citizens
  • People born in Croatia, with at least one Croatian parent, but only if they apply for Croatian citizenship before they turn 18 years of age
  • People born abroad, if they have one Croatian parent, and one parent without citizenship
  • People born abroad, but adopted by Croatian citizens
  • Children born and/or found within Croatia without knowing their parents. They will be considered Croatian, if their true origin is not established before they turn 14 years of age.

If a person was born in Croatia, but moved abroad and gained a foreign nationality, they may also apply for citizenship based on origin. However, they must meet the following conditions:

  1. Hold permanent residence in Croatia at the time of application
  2. They have given up their foreign nationality, or can show proof that they will once they acquire Croatian citizenship
  3. Show that they respect the legal order and customs of Croatia
Image by Pedro Ribeiro Simões

Citizenship Based on Lineage

Croatian emigrants and their descendants to a 3rd degree of kinship in a straight line (e.g. children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren) may apply for citizenship. They are required to show they respect the legal order and cultures of Croatia as well as take and pass the Croatian language and culture test. There has been discussion by the government about removing this requirement, but it has not been implemented yet as of July 22, 2019 when we last called the ministry to check on it.

Citizenship Based on Naturalization

According to the Croatian Citizenship Act, foreigners that fulfill the following conditions may apply for Croatian citizenship:

  1. They are more than 18 years old and they are able to work
  2. They no longer hold their foreign nationality, or have submitted evidence that he or she will be released from their foreign nationality if he or she is granted Croatian citizenship
  3. They have resided in the Republic of Croatia continuously for 8 years and hold the status of a permanent resident
  4. Passed a test of the Croatian language and culture
  5. From his or her behavior can be inferred that he or she respects the legal order and customs in the Republic of Croatia.

Underage children can be granted Croatian citizenship on the basis of naturalization:

  • If both of its parents are being granted citizenship on the basis of naturalization
  • If only one of its parents is being granted citizenship on basis of naturalization AND the child is living in Croatia and has valid residency
  • If only one of its parents is being granted citizenship on basis of naturalization AND the other parent has no citizenship, or citizenship is unknown – even if the child lives abroad

Citizenship Based on a Marriage to a Croatian National

Spouses of Croatian citizens that at the time of application hold permanent residence in Croatia only need to show that they hold permanent residence and that they respect the legal order and customs in the Republic of Croatia.

Special Interest to Republic of Croatia

Foreign national whose Croatian citizenship would represent a benefit to the Republic of Croatia may apply for citizenship through naturalization as long as they show, through behavior, that they respect the legal order and customs of Croatia. The same would apply for their spouse.

The Department of Internal Affairs is in charge of deciding whether the person applying for citizenship based on special interest to Republic of Croatia has a valid claim to it due to their capabilities or knowledge.

Re-admission to Croatian Citizenship

A person who at some point had Croatian nationality, but had asked to be released from it in order to become a citizen of some other country, can request to be granted Croatian citizenship again.

To qualify, they must show they respect the legal order and customs in the Republic of Croatia AND have valid residency in Croatia at the time of application.

A Member of Croatian People

People who do not have Croatian nationality, but had at some point in their life stated in some type of legal document that they feel affiliation to Croatian people, or they can prove that they were active in the protection of rights and the promotion of the interests of the Croatian people and/or they have participated in Croatian cultural, scientific and sport associations abroad can also request Croatian citizenship. Like all of the above cases, they must show they respect the legal order and customs.

Citizenship Based On International Treaties

The Croatian Citizenship Act allows the possibility for the question of citizenship to be regulated on the basis of international treaties. However, at the time that this article was written, no such agreement was mentioned in the law.

Image by sheilaahmadi

How to Apply for Citizenship in Croatia

The application for the acquisition of Croatian citizenship should be submitted in person at the main police station, closest to your place of residence. If you are not physically present in Croatia, you may apply at an embassy or consular office of Croatia abroad.

Please note that it will take much longer to be approved if applying through a consular office rather than in person in Croatia. In one such case, a child of a Croatian citizen applied at an embassy abroad. After 2 years of waiting, still had not been approved. This person came to Croatia and applied again in person. She was approved in 2 weeks.

If the applicant is a disabled person, the claim may be filed by their legal representative or authorized proxy.

In addition to submitting the completed application, you will also need to provide:

  • A biography (similar to a CV or resume)
  • A birth certificate (apostilled, translated and notarized if it is a foreign birth certificate)
  • A marriage certificate, if applying on the basis of marriage (must be apostilled, translated and notarized if married outside Croatia)
  • Proof of nationality
  • A background check issued by your country of nationality proving you have not been criminally prosecuted. Must not be older than six months.
  • A valid identity document with a visible photo
  • Proof that you have passed the Croatian language and culture test (if applicable to your situation)

Depending on the basis for the application, other documents may be required.

Fees

When submitting the application in Republic of Croatia, there is an administrative fee in the amount of 20 kuna.

If you request is granted, you will need to pay 1.500 kuna if you applied in Croatia.  If you applied in a diplomatic mission or consular office of the Republic of Croatia abroad, you will pay in accordance with their consular fees.

More Information

If granted Croatian citizenship, the document proving the new status of a Croatian citizen can be acquired at any Registrar’s Office in Croatia. This document is called “domovnica”. Here are instructions on how to get your domovnica.

The application process for citizenship can take a significant amount of time, especially if you are a third-party national applying based on residency and not marriage. Expect to wait a minimum of  two years or more.

Once you have your citizenship, the next step is to apply for a national ID and a passport.

Has anyone applied for citizenship as a non-EU national AND is not married to a Croatian citizen? If so, please share your story.

Sharing is Caring:

78 thoughts on “How to apply for citizenship in Croatia

  1. Scooter McGavin
    February 27, 2019 @ 5:06 pm

    Any ideas if applying based on lineage works in the opposite direction? I’m a third-party national, married/divorced to a Croatian with a child born in Croatia.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 19, 2019 @ 11:06 am

      Hi Joe,

      Can you clarify your question? What do you mean by “opposite direction”?

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Scooter McGavin
        May 6, 2019 @ 12:31 pm

        Meaning, I am not the descendant of a Croatian, but I do have descendants (of myself) that are Croatian – “I’m a third-party national, married/divorced to a Croatian with a child born in Croatia.”

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          May 15, 2019 @ 10:52 am

          Hi Scooter,

          You cannot apply for citizenship based on the nationality of your children. If you are married to a Croatian, then you can apply for citizenship after gaining permanent residency and residing in Croatia for 8 years.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  2. Marnie Pate
    March 30, 2019 @ 7:06 pm

    My father was born in Croatia. I was born in Texas. My son has been playing professional basketball in Europe and would like to apply for dual citizenship. What are your thoughts? What are the odds?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      April 3, 2019 @ 12:53 pm

      Hi Marnie,

      If you can prove that your father was born in Croatia, then both you and your son qualify to apply for Croatian citizenship without having to give up your currently nationality.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  3. Jerry Vlasic
    April 4, 2019 @ 5:43 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I love your site…very informative. I have two great-grandparents born in Vlasic Brdo and Restovo who emigrated here to the states many years ago. I’ve been able to locate their parish birth records via the Croatian National Archives. It appears I could apply for Croatian citizenship via lineage (up to 3rd degree), correct? I also understand the language requirement, etc., may be rescinded in proposed changes to the Citizenship Act. Do you know the status on those amendments? Thanks in advance.

    Jerry

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      April 9, 2019 @ 1:22 pm

      Hi Jerry,

      Thank you for following!

      I do not know the status. Once I hear, I’ll post on the Facebook page.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  4. ilya
    April 10, 2019 @ 11:37 am

    Hello Sara,

    I’m non-EU national citizen and will be getting married soon with my Croatian girlfriend.We are planning to live in at least 3 years in my country not in Croatia.

    I have 3 questions;

    1)Should we get married in Croatia? (for not to have problem and faster in future processes)

    2) Should we live in Croatia for become or apply citizenship Croatian?

    3) How long we shoud be into marriage to become Croatian citizenship by laws?

    Thank you in advance

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      April 16, 2019 @ 3:04 pm

      Hi Ilya,

      Thank you for the questions!

      1) If you plan to move back to Croatia long term, then yes, getting married in Croatia will make things easier.

      2) and 3) You as the spouse cannot apply for Croatian citizenship until you’ve lived in Croatia with your spouse with legal residence for 8 years.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  5. Mo Sayel
    April 15, 2019 @ 6:04 am

    Hi Sara,

    Great article! My father is a deceased Croatian citizen but I am not. I have proof of his citizenship from a Croatian court. I would like to apply for Croatian citizenship via a Croatian consular in the United States. Does that process also take 2 years?

    Do my daughters qualify for citizenship? My wife?

    Thank you,
    -Mo Sayel

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      April 16, 2019 @ 3:02 pm

      Hi Mo,

      Thank you for the question! You and your daughters qualify for citizenship, but your wife is not entitled to it. She would need to live here in Croatia with you with legal residence for 8 years before she can qualify to apply for citizenship.

      The process for you and your daughters to apply could take a long time, years possibly, if you go through a consulate. It will go much faster if you do it within Croatia.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  6. Valeria
    May 9, 2019 @ 10:01 pm

    Hi Sara,

    My husband’s grandfather was born in Croatia and lived there for some years. Is it feasible for him and my children to get the citizenship? We live in Argentina. Many thanks!
    Valeria

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      May 15, 2019 @ 10:50 am

      Hi Valeria,

      It is definitely feasible for your husband to get citizenship. Once he has citizenship, then your children should be able to apply since their father has citizenship.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  7. Sara
    May 18, 2019 @ 3:58 pm

    In 2012 I was living in Zagreb, and I inquired about getting my domovnica through my grandmother who was a Croatian citizen (I am a US citizen). The authority who granted my temporary resident visa said that it would take much longer to get citizenship if I applied in Croatia because the consultate was set up to handle applications more efficiently. Where did you get your information that it’s faster in Croatia as I was told the opposite, and am wanting to finally finish the process. Hvala!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      May 27, 2019 @ 10:11 am

      Hi Sara,

      I’m flabbergasted that anyone would tell you it’s faster at a consulate. All the stories I’ve heard of people applying for citizenship has gone much faster in Croatia. They were all stalled when going to a consulate. Regardless of where you apply for citizenship, it still has to go to Zagreb for approval. That being said 2012 was a long time ago, and a lot has changed. I recommend doing it in Croatia.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Sarah Crnec
        July 16, 2019 @ 4:22 pm

        Hi Sara
        Both of my grandparents were born and raised in Croatia. They had 14 children, 7 born in Croatia and 7 born in Canada after they immigrated here. Later in life, my father got his Croatian citizenship but is now passed away. Is it possible for me to get my Croatian citizenship without giving up my Canadian citizenship?
        Thanks!
        Sarah

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          July 22, 2019 @ 2:52 pm

          Hi Sarah,

          Croatia will not make you give up your Canadian citizenship. You’ll need to check with Canada if they allow dual citizenship.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  8. Diana
    May 23, 2019 @ 6:21 am

    The father of my children was born in Croatia and has current a Croatian passport and osobna karta. My three children are planning to apply for citizenship this summer while we are in Croatia. One of my children is 20 years old and the other two (twins) are 17 years old. Do you know if their father needs to be present when applying in Croatia or is submitting all of the paperwork sufficient on his behalf sufficient?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      May 27, 2019 @ 10:07 am

      Hi Diana,

      Their father doesn’t need to be present. They will need to provide proof that he holds Croatian nationality.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  9. Maria
    May 28, 2019 @ 4:30 pm

    Hi, once all the paperwork has been done… Is it possible to check the status online using the number they give me? Is there any webpage for that? Thanks!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 13, 2019 @ 9:07 am

      Hi Maria,

      There is no way to check the status online. You must wait until the police call you with an update.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  10. Mara
    June 4, 2019 @ 2:34 pm

    Hi Sara,
    Thank you for all of the info!
    My partner and our daughter are interested in becoming Croatian Citizens. My partner’s grandparents were both born close to Opatija.
    Questions:
    How much of the year do you have to live in Croatia once you get citizenship?
    Our daughter turns 21 on Feb 4, 2020. She would also like to gain Croatian citizenship and is currently living in Europe. Could she gain citizenship through my partner if he gains it before her 21st birthday?
    Thank you!
    Mara

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 13, 2019 @ 8:57 am

      Hi Mara,

      There are no requirements to stay in Croatia with citizenship. Your partner and daughter never need to live in Croatia with citizenship. Also, there are no age restrictions so your daughter can apply for citizenship at any time.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  11. Edwards Thomas
    June 5, 2019 @ 7:05 pm

    Hi Sara, Thank you for your informative article. Do you know if the language requirement has been removed as part of the requirement? Your article mentions it is been removed as of 2019. Thanks for clarifying!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 13, 2019 @ 8:51 am

      Hi Thomas,

      Honestly, I have heard conflicting information. I have heard that it’s already in place, but have also heard that the legislation is still unfinished. I’m working to find out what the truth is at the moment. When I do, I will update the post.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  12. Andrew Zacchigna
    June 8, 2019 @ 11:29 pm

    Hello,

    My Grandfather was born and grew up in Croatia. He immigrated to Canada when he was in this young teens in 1956, his Mother stayed in Croatia. When she died the Croatian Government seized the house and land more the 25 acres since no relatives lived there. He gets letters with the option to reclaim the house and land from the Croatian government.

    He finally decided he wanted to go through with it and wants to leave it to his grand children.

    In order to go through with this, would he have to get his citizenship first because of the laws about aquireing land as a foreigner? Or since him and his brothers still have a claim to it, it doesnt apply?

    Also, would he have to get his citizenship before his kids and grandkids are able to get theirs?

    Thank you very much in advance.

    We are planning a trip to see the property and are planning on applying in person for the citizenships because of the quicker responce time, which is also why i asked the above question.

    Andrew Zacchigna

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 13, 2019 @ 8:48 am

      Hi Andrew,

      It will make all simpler if he applies for his citizenship first. As long as all the paperwork is in order, his application should go quickly. He will need to gain his citizenship before any of his descendants can apply.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  13. Nikki
    June 21, 2019 @ 7:30 am

    Dobar dan! thanks for all the info !
    I will be apply for citizenship very soon as my grandparents were both born in Croatia but moved to England.

    Am I correct in thinking the biography is a ‘story’ explaining the the history of your family and why you would like citizenship?
    How long does this need to be ?

    Hvala puno!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 30, 2019 @ 4:34 pm

      Hi Nikki,

      Thank you for the question and your patience while I dug into this!

      The biography should include who you are, your link to Croatian heritage, what you do, where you grew up, if you are married and have kids, and why you want to be Croatian. The example I saw was a solid two-page letter.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  14. Ray V
    June 24, 2019 @ 3:24 am

    Hi Sara,
    I left Croatia while it was still Jugoslavija. I was born in modern day Croatian territory. Would that imply that I was born in Croatia?

    Thanks

    Ray

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 26, 2019 @ 2:48 pm

      Hi Ray,

      Yes, that would mean that you are Croatian. 🙂

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Rich Stefani
        September 5, 2019 @ 9:34 pm

        Hi Sara, similar to Ray’s question: My dad was born in Lussingrande, in the Province of Istria (at the time part of Italy), but now, modern day Veli Losinj. His family fled when he was 16. Although he has Italian citizenship and US, he’d like to retire in Croatia. Do you think he can get Croatian citizenship? Also, any ideas on how to go about this from the US? Unfortunately, the application is all in Croatian! Thanks, Rich

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          September 9, 2019 @ 2:28 pm

          Hi Rich,

          I suggest speaking to a Croatian consulate or embassy closest to where you life to start the application.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  15. Freddy S
    June 29, 2019 @ 3:57 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I’m from Venezuela, my grandfather was born Croatia and he immigrated to Venezuela, I requested an updated birth certificate of my grandfather which I already have in hand, I’m waiting for the Citizenship Act to be approved at the parliament so I can Apply without taking the test.

    Can I travel to Croatia as a Venezuelan tourist and apply there with my wife? I’m worried that it will take years to be approved If I apply here.

    What I didn’t understand is that takes longer if you are a third party national, does that mean that it will take the same amount of time if I apply either in Croatia or at consulate office just because I’m third party national?

    Thank you in advance,

    Freddy

    {reply}

  16. Zora
    July 17, 2019 @ 9:41 am

    Hi Sara,

    I am currently in Croatia as a student granted temporary residency. Both of my parents hold Croatian citizenship but were born in Bosnia and Hercegovina, and I would like to try and obtain citizenship while I’m here. Will this cause any issues?

    I’ve also heard that any required documentation must be provided and notarized within the past 6 months. Am I able to do this abroad for my birth certificate and parents’ proof of nationality?

    Also, the citizenship application link brings me to the MUP website, but I don’t see any forms on it.

    Thanks so much for creating this guide, very helpful!

    Best,
    Zora

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      July 24, 2019 @ 2:00 pm

      Hi Zora,

      Thank you for the questions!

      If you can prove that one of your parents have Croatian citizenship, then you should be alright. Best to bring their original domovnica. For your birth certificate, get it apostilled in your home country. Then bring it to Croatia to have it translated and notarized.

      I’ve updated the link to the citizenship application. Here it is for your reference: https://mup.gov.hr/UserDocsImages/Dokumenti/drzavljanstvo/obrazac1_stjecanje_prirodjenje_punoljetni.pdf

      Thanks for following!

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  17. James Gerbich
    July 30, 2019 @ 9:26 am

    Hi Sara

    From what I’ve read applying for citizenship via consulate can take two years if not more. If you travel to say a Zagreb Police Station with the necessary documentation do you think this would be a much faster way of getting it processed. (FYI I’m a New Zealand citizen but both parents are Croatian decent)
    Regards
    James

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 7, 2019 @ 1:23 pm

      Hi James,

      Yes, applying for citizenship within Croatia will be infinitely faster.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  18. Leonie
    August 5, 2019 @ 12:12 pm

    My grandfather was born in Croatia and I still have Uncles, Aunts and Cousins living in Croatia but my Father and Mother were born in Australia.

    What are my chances of gaining citizenship or at least obtaining a Croatian passport?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 7, 2019 @ 1:21 pm

      Hi Leonie,

      You may apply for citizenship since your grandfather was born in Croatia.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Leonie
        August 8, 2019 @ 11:23 am

        Hi Sara.

        Thank you for that information.

        Can you please tell me what the next steps are?

        Thank you.

        Leonie

        {reply}

  19. Mike
    August 6, 2019 @ 1:17 am

    Hi Sara. Excellent and informative article. I was born in Canada but my parents are both from Croatia who immigrated to Canada. I went through the process of applying for citizenship and recently (6 months ago) received my domovnica. My question is what do I do now? I was told that about an ID card the government gives to citizen’s (which I assume I can apply for)? Also, how long would it take to get a Croatian passport? Also, my kids applied for citizenship prior to me receiving citizenship (through my parents – their grandparents). Because of this, will it take longer for them to get their respective citizenships ( I received mine in 8 months). Many thanks in advance.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 7, 2019 @ 1:47 pm

      Hi Mike,

      Thank you for following the site!

      We are working on a post right now about the next step, which would be to apply for your passport so stay tuned for that. The national ID card is for residents of Croatia. Are you living in Croatia or do you plan to stay in Canada?

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  20. Hannah
    August 10, 2019 @ 3:49 pm

    My great-grandparents were Croatian, is there any chance of me being able to apply for citizenship?

    {reply}

  21. Dee Schmidt
    August 10, 2019 @ 4:35 pm

    Hello,

    My father was born in Split, however left Croatia to immigrate to Australia when it was still a part of Yugoslavia. He passed away in 1988.

    I am planning to submit my citizenship application forms at the administrative police station in Split when I visit in September, however I’m unsure about the language and cultural test component. When and how do I complete the test? Can I get information in advance to ‘study’ for the test/know what the requirements are?

    Kind regards,
    D

    {reply}

  22. Robert
    August 14, 2019 @ 12:54 am

    Hi, great article!
    Just a few questions regarding citizenship…
    I live in Canada, am 47 years old,
    Was born in Ljubljana to Croatian parents born in Cakovec where I was baptized. Emigrated to Canada at age 2 in 1974. I am fluent in Croatian, played soccer for our local Croatian soccer club, went to Croatian school, so yes, I am in touch with the culture! My parents both have their domovnice and I’m hoping to buy property in Dalmacija sometime in the near future for retirement. BTW my wife and I spend our vacations there almost every year.
    Just wondering would I be able to apply for citizenship through naturalization because of my parents though I was born in Slovenia? What documents would I need and is it better to do it in Croatia or a consulate which is not far from me here in Canada?
    Thanks

    {reply}

  23. Tony
    August 16, 2019 @ 2:49 am

    Hi Sara how do I find out if I am a citizen of Croatia? My parents were both Croatian born I was also Croatian born 60 years ago and lived in Croatia/Yugoslavia till I was 4 years old I have a birth certificate etc. I have been back a few times but never checked into my status I am thinking of going back in sept and was wondering where do I go to check my status.

    {reply}

  24. Dennis Coleman
    August 16, 2019 @ 12:10 pm

    Hi Sara

    I have been living in Zagreb for 11 yrs (not married and am from the U.K), I have a daughter (10 yrs) and since I have been here, I have never really been concerned with taking citizenship mainly because of the paper-chasing, costs involved and of of course the length of time it takes.

    After a recent visit to MUP I was asked “why didn’t I have Croatian citizenship?” which seem to make me think about it.

    Ok my question for you is, what is the advantage of me taking Citizenship?

    Dennis

    {reply}

  25. Eliot Zizic
    August 27, 2019 @ 1:48 am

    Hi Sara,

    My grandfather was born in Rijeka in 1911, prior to Yugoslavia, in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. I believe I am still eligible to apply for Croatian citizenship, and I do have a photocopy of his birth certificate. Is this enough proof of lineage? Is there a resource of birth records dating back before the existence of Yugoslavia that can be accessed in case they require further proof of lineage? Also, can I take the test at a consular office in the US, then actually apply for citizenship a few months down the road in Croatia and present proof of passing the test at that point, or does it all happen at the same time? Thank you so much!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 2, 2019 @ 9:32 am

      Hi Eliot,

      I recommend getting an official copy of the birth certificate. Here are instructions: https://www.expatincroatia.com/how-to-copy-birth-certificate/ You can also try to get an official copy of proof of citizenship. Here are instructions: https://www.expatincroatia.com/domovnica-proof-of-citizenship/

      Usually, you start the application then take the test for citizenship. If you plan to take the test abroad, you’ll need to take the test at an approved location. The consular office will provide this to you. However, my recommendation would be to do the entire process in Croatia as it will go much much faster.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  26. Andy Sterpin
    August 30, 2019 @ 8:40 pm

    Hi Sara,

    My parents were both born in Italy (Istria) before WW2 ended. After WW2 ended, they became Yugoslavian. In 1964 they emigrated to Canada and had a family.

    Would they be considered Italian or Yugoslavian or Canadian or Croatian? And if so, can I apply for dual citizenship?

    Andy

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 2, 2019 @ 9:29 am

      Hi Andy,

      Thanks for the question!

      You would need to contact Croatian authorities to check considering the uniqueness of the situation. My recommendation would be to go to a Croatian embassy or consulate to request proof of their citizenship. Here are the instructions: https://www.expatincroatia.com/domovnica-proof-of-citizenship/ If you can get proof of their citizenship, then you would qualify to apply for citizenship.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  27. Max Magdalenic
    September 5, 2019 @ 5:03 am

    Hello Sara,

    My father was born in Rijeka when it was under Italian rule I believe in the late 1930’s. I’m not sure if this is a problem for applying for Croatian citizenship? My mother was also born in a small village in eastern Croatia so we only need one parent to apply through if my father’s residence issue serves as a problem?

    Also, when my parents moved to Canada would they have been required to give up Croatian citizenship or does it matter as long as they were born in Croatia?

    Lastly, I’m not sure if you know the answer to this but if I do not speak with my parents anymore am I still able to request their documents like birth certificate, passport etc…without their permission?

    Thank you!
    Max

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 9, 2019 @ 2:34 pm

      Hi Max,

      You can get proof that your parents are Croatian citizens by going to the Registrar in Croatia. Reference the last two paragraphs of this post: https://www.expatincroatia.com/domovnica-proof-of-citizenship/

      I can’t speak to what Canada required them to do when they left Croatia.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  28. Wendy
    September 5, 2019 @ 6:11 pm

    Hi Sara
    Thank you for a very informative site! Please forgive me for the multitude of questions I am about to ask! My Partner would like to apply for Croatian Citizenship; his sister has already done hers, so we know he qualifies. We are in South Africa from the info read here I see it may be best to for him to do the application in Croatia, as he does not want to wait years for it. If he were to do this, what documents would he need, besides the CV, his Passport, his birth certificate and Police clearance? Does he need both his parent’s birth certificates and his grandparents, or only the parents/grandparents with Croatian citizenship and do we need to get everything translated here first. Should he do the language test before going over or will he be required to do it in Croatia?
    Thanks and Regards
    Wendy

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 9, 2019 @ 2:31 pm

      Hi Wendy,

      Thank you for following the site!

      The documents needed are listed in this post. He will need to prove his lineage, which can be done through domovnica or birth certificates of whomever has the citizenship closest to him in the family line. I recommend doing it all in Croatia: the application, the test and the certified translations.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  29. Zvonko
    September 7, 2019 @ 5:32 pm

    Hi Sara,
    I was born in Croatia and emigrated as a boy of 8 with my parents who were both Croatian to Canada in 1970. We became Canadian citizens in 1975. My question is at what point would I have lost my Croatian citizenship, cause I believe I would have been one based on being born there? At this point I’m considering moving back, I still have my parents house there, and I believe I need my Croatian citizenship to do that. I have my original krstni list and I believe the process should be straight forward. Can I apply for what ever status or paper work I need to acquire, while I’m still in Canada. I will be staying in Croatia for 3 months this spring, would it be advantageous to apply for anything at that time while I’m there? One last question! Could I just move back to my parents house and live there without reacquiring anything? Is this doable and what are the disadvantages of doing this?

    Thanks, Zvonko

    {reply}

  30. Mala Matacin
    September 17, 2019 @ 1:37 pm

    Hello, Sara.

    Once again, thank you SO much for this site–it’s been so helpful! You have a link to a form in this post (submitting the completed application) but the application is in Croatian. Is there any chance there is one in English? Thank you!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 24, 2019 @ 12:30 pm

      Hi Mala,

      The application is only offered in Croatia, but we’re working on preparing a translation as we speak. Stay tuned!

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  31. Dijana
    September 23, 2019 @ 7:33 am

    Hi Sara,

    I was born in Croatia and both my parents were born and lived in Croatia. I came to Australia when I was a baby on my mother’s passport. How do i apply for a Croatian passport?

    Thank you
    Dijana

    {reply}

  32. Sylvia Martinovic
    October 8, 2019 @ 3:20 pm

    Hi Sara

    My late father came to South Africa in 1938 and was born in Dubrovnik. My brother and I are South African born and have visited Croatia many times in the past and even though my brother is quite fluent in Croatian due to exposure, I am not. We would like to apply for Croatian citizenship. Is this possible and what will be required?

    Regards
    Sylvia

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      October 9, 2019 @ 3:03 pm

      Hi Sylvia,

      Everything that is required is listed in this post.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  33. Hugh
    October 9, 2019 @ 7:45 am

    Hi Sara!

    Do you have a sense for the average wait time to receive a domovnica? I have Croatian lineage through my grandmother and I applied for citizenship 12 months ago via a consulate in Australia but I’m still waiting.

    I’m about to move to Europe to study and I have a visa sorted but an EU passport will make getting a job post-study much easier.

    I don’t suppose there’s anything I could do to expedite the process while I’m over in Europe?

    Thanks in advance

    H

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      October 9, 2019 @ 2:58 pm

      Hi Hugh,

      To clarify, you are waiting on approval for citizenship. Then after you are approved, you can request a domovnica.

      Your wait time is not unusual. Since you are a non-EU national, it would not be unusual for you to wait a couple years for it to be processed. There is nothing that can be done to expedite the process. Wish I had better news for you!

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

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