How to apply for citizenship in Croatia

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Citizenship in Croatia is an elusive golden goose. For the non-EU nationals, it is Mount Everest, which is an appropriate analogy since such a small fraction of people who even try make it to the summit. By the time they make it, they are certainly weak, beaten down and possibly near death.

I’m not going to mince words here. If you do not have Croatian heritage or are married to a Croatian, it is highly unlikely you will ever qualify to even apply for citizenship.

To be even clearer, do not move to Croatia thinking that you’ll be able to get citizenship one day. Every day, the government is changing laws to prevent foreigners from achieving permanent residency, which is a mandatory requirement for applying for citizenship.

Before you ask, I do not have special powers to get you around any requirements, I don’t know anyone at the Ministry, and I don’t have any secrets to getting through the system other than expressing the importance of kindness, patience, and a calm demeanor.

Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, here is how the chosen few can apply for citizenship in Croatia.

Identify Your Valid Claim to Croatian Citizenship

To apply for citizenship in Croatia, you must prove that you have a claim. You may make a valid claim based on the following situations:

  • Origin
  • Lineage
  • Naturalization
  • Special interest to Croatia
  • Member of Croatian people
  • International treaties

We will now go through each one claim included in the Croatian Citizenship Act.

Citizenship Based on Origin

The following groups of people may have or request citizenship on the grounds of origin:

  • People whose parents at the time of their birth were Croatian citizens (there are exceptions to this)
  • People born in Croatia, with at least one Croatian parent, but only if they apply for Croatian citizenship before they turn 18 years of age
  • People born abroad, if they have one Croatian parent, and one parent without citizenship
  • People born abroad, but adopted by Croatian citizens
  • Children born and/or found within Croatia without knowing their parents. They will be considered Croatian, if their true origin is not established before they turn 14 years of age.

If a person was born in Croatia, but moved abroad and gained a foreign nationality, they may also apply for citizenship based on origin. However, they must meet the following conditions:

  1. Hold permanent residence in Croatia at the time of application
  2. They have given up their foreign nationality, or can show proof that they will once they acquire Croatian citizenship
  3. Show that they respect the legal order and customs of Croatia
Image by Pedro Ribeiro Simões

Citizenship Based on Lineage

Croatian emigrants and their descendants in a straight line (e.g. children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, etc) may apply for citizenship. They are required to show they respect the legal order. The requirement to take the language and culture tests is no longer required for those applying based on origin starting January 1, 2020.

There are exceptions. If your parent, grandparent, etc. left Croatia before October 8, 1991 and moved to another country within Yugoslavia, then their descendants cannot apply for Croatian nationality. If your parent, grandparent, etc. left Croatia after October 8, 1991, then their descendants cannot apply for nationality either.

Citizenship Based on Naturalization

According to the Croatian Citizenship Act, foreigners that fulfill the following conditions may apply for Croatian citizenship:

  1. They are more than 18 years old and they are able to work
  2. They no longer hold their foreign nationality, or have submitted evidence that he or she will be released from their foreign nationality if he or she is granted Croatian citizenship
  3. They have resided in the Republic of Croatia continuously for 8 years and hold the status of a permanent resident
  4. Passed a test of the Croatian language and culture
  5. From his or her behavior can be inferred that he or she respects the legal order and customs in the Republic of Croatia.

Underage children can be granted Croatian citizenship on the basis of naturalization:

  • If both of its parents are being granted citizenship on the basis of naturalization
  • If only one of its parents is being granted citizenship on basis of naturalization AND the child is living in Croatia and has valid residency
  • If only one of its parents is being granted citizenship on basis of naturalization AND the other parent has no citizenship, or citizenship is unknown – even if the child lives abroad

Citizenship Based on a Marriage to a Croatian National

Spouses of Croatian citizens that at the time of application hold permanent residence in Croatia only need to show that they hold permanent residence and that they respect the legal order and customs in the Republic of Croatia.

Special Interest to Republic of Croatia

Foreign national whose Croatian citizenship would represent a benefit to the Republic of Croatia may apply for citizenship through naturalization as long as they show, through behavior, that they respect the legal order and customs of Croatia. Their spouse can then apply for residency based on family reunification.

The Department of Internal Affairs is in charge of deciding whether the person applying for citizenship based on special interest to Republic of Croatia has a valid claim to it due to their capabilities or knowledge.

Re-admission to Croatian Citizenship

A person who at some point had Croatian nationality, but had asked to be released from it in order to become a citizen of some other country, can request to be granted Croatian citizenship again.

To qualify, they must show they respect the legal order and customs in the Republic of Croatia AND have valid residency in Croatia at the time of application.

A Member of Croatian People

People who do not have Croatian nationality, but had at some point in their life stated in some type of legal document that they feel affiliation to Croatian people, or they can prove that they were active in the protection of rights and the promotion of the interests of the Croatian people and/or they have participated in Croatian cultural, scientific and sport associations abroad can also request Croatian citizenship. Like all of the above cases, they must show they respect the legal order and customs. They also must have legal residency in Croatia.

Citizenship Based On International Treaties

The Croatian Citizenship Act allows the possibility for the question of citizenship to be regulated on the basis of international treaties. However, at the time that this article was written, no such agreement was mentioned in the law.

Image by sheilaahmadi

How to Apply for Citizenship in Croatia

The application for the acquisition of Croatian citizenship should be submitted in person at the main police station, closest to your place of residence. If you are not physically present in Croatia, you may apply at an embassy or consular office of Croatia abroad. From January 1, 2020, non-residents can no longer apply for citizenship from within Croatia. You must apply at a consular office or embassy abroad closest to your residence.

If the applicant is a disabled person, the claim may be filed by their legal representative or authorized proxy.

In addition to submitting the completed application, you will also need to provide:

  • A biography (similar to a CV or resume)
  • A birth certificate (apostilled, translated and notarized if it is a foreign birth certificate)
  • A marriage certificate, if applying on the basis of marriage (must be apostilled, translated and notarized if married outside Croatia)
  • Proof of nationality
  • A background check issued by your country of nationality proving you have not been criminally prosecuted. Must not be older than six months. (apostilled, translated and notarized)
  • A valid identity document with a visible photo (with a copy apostilled, translated and notarized)
  • Proof that you have passed the Croatian language and culture test (if applicable to your situation, as noted above)
  • Proof of lineage (if applicable to your situation, as noted above) NOTE: All names MUST match on your documents.

Depending on the basis for the application, other documents may be required.

Fees

When submitting the application in Republic of Croatia, there is an administrative fee in the amount of 20 kuna.

If you request is granted, you will need to pay 1.500 kuna if you applied in Croatia.  If you applied in a diplomatic mission or consular office of the Republic of Croatia abroad, you will pay in accordance with their consular fees.

More Information

If granted Croatian citizenship, the document proving the new status of a Croatian citizen can be acquired at any Registrar’s Office in Croatia. This document is called “domovnica”. Here are instructions on how to get your domovnica.

The application process for citizenship can take a significant amount of time, especially if you are a third-party national applying based on residency and not marriage. Expect to wait a minimum of  two years or more.

Once you have your citizenship, the next step is to apply for a national ID and a passport. Usually, you’ll get a national ID (called “osobna iskanica” as part of the citizenship approval.

Has anyone applied for citizenship as a non-EU national AND is not married to a Croatian citizen? If so, please share your story.

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207 thoughts on “How to apply for citizenship in Croatia

  1. Scooter McGavin
    February 27, 2019 @ 5:06 pm

    Any ideas if applying based on lineage works in the opposite direction? I’m a third-party national, married/divorced to a Croatian with a child born in Croatia.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 19, 2019 @ 11:06 am

      Hi Joe,

      Can you clarify your question? What do you mean by “opposite direction”?

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Scooter McGavin
        May 6, 2019 @ 12:31 pm

        Meaning, I am not the descendant of a Croatian, but I do have descendants (of myself) that are Croatian – “I’m a third-party national, married/divorced to a Croatian with a child born in Croatia.”

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          May 15, 2019 @ 10:52 am

          Hi Scooter,

          You cannot apply for citizenship based on the nationality of your children. If you are married to a Croatian, then you can apply for citizenship after gaining permanent residency and residing in Croatia for 8 years.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

          • Neeraj
            October 23, 2019 @ 12:51 am

            Hi,

            I fullfil all the criteria including five in Croatia.. And I have gone through the language exam also but haven’t got any information after exam that what to do or how long it will take

            Can u pls explain me how it takes after applying for Croatian visa and after giving the language exam

          • Expat in Croatia
            October 29, 2019 @ 12:29 pm

            Hi Neeraj,

            Can you clarify your situation? Are you applying for citizenship? If you’ve passed the exam for citizenship, then you should take this proof to the police station where you are doing your application so it can be added to your file.

            Regards,

            Sara

      • hope arnold
        October 15, 2019 @ 5:41 pm

        Can you PLEASE tell me where, who to call or any specific information on where to turn in my docs when applying for citizenship/passport through lineage?
        There are about 25 e-mail addresses and I can’t figure out where to go.
        Dubrovnik?
        Zadar?
        Split?
        Zagreb?
        I can fly to any of the above.
        Thank you…
        This is so frustrating, I’m almost over it.

        {reply}

        • hope arnold
          October 15, 2019 @ 5:50 pm

          I wanted to add,
          I have everything on the check list, I believe.
          All birth certificates apostled, fingerprinted and criminal record, personal ID and “CV”
          What I haven’t done is my language test but everyone I spoke to in croatia says I don’t need it.
          (Regarding last part, none of them were official as, I’ve no clue who and where to go to ask if I am in possession of everything I need. Which is my question to you)
          I would love to email someone in the department what I have to see what I am missing before I fly back to croatia.

          {reply}

          • Expat in Croatia
            October 16, 2019 @ 11:11 am

            Hi Hope,

            If you do not have residence in Croatia, then you need to apply for citizenship in Zagreb. The office is located at Petrinjska 30 and you can contact them at [email protected] or +385 (0)1 4563 639.

            The language test is a required item on the list, HOWEVER, I’ve heard many scenarios where this has not be requested. All depends on who you talk to and your situation.

            Regards,

            Sara

        • hope arnold
          November 22, 2019 @ 6:55 pm

          Hello, thank you for the information.
          After loitering in and adjacent to Croatia while compiling the paperwork I need, I have been following online directions, your advice to apply in Zagreb (without residency) and that advice of others that have said applying IN Croatia is best.

          I finally received everything from the USA Government and booked a flight to Zagreb to apply when one of the Consulate reps (it looks like from Italy?) sent me this;

          No. You cannot apply in Croatia if you do not residence in Croatia. You have to apply in the country of your residence.

          Konzularni ured/Ufficio Consolare
          Veleposlanstvo RH/Ambasciata della Repubblica di Croazia
          Via Luigi Bodio 74-76, 00191 Roma, Italia
          Tel: 0039 06 36307627; 0039 06 36304630
          Fax: 0039 06 36303269

          That stated, I am well aware that showing up in Zagreb I may have a different reaction. It would not be the first time I have received conflicting advice.

          I do not know if I should cancel the flight and simply return to the USA to apply or if I should just “try” in person.

          I did call Zagreb and wrote to no response.

          The ministry at the main email address) has confirmed in a separate correspondence, the need to tackle the language. It is still unclear if that is a thing that must be done on the day you apply or a later date. (Another reason I hesitate to bother flying there to wing it)
          I have also written this ministry personnel to confirm whether the Consulate information of only being able to apply in my country of residence is correct. (No answer yet.)

          Any advice?

          It looks to me on the Ministry’s web page and here after asking you and in other stories I’ve read that people without residency do apply and find it easier to apply in Croatia. (Without residency)

          I know that is a lot to take in.
          My head is spinning constantly with the curve balls and opinions of each official I speak with.

          Thank you!!

          {reply}

          • hope arnold
            November 22, 2019 @ 8:07 pm

            Sorry, one addition. You originally said I must apply in zagreb (without residency)

            Is there no chance in Dubrovnik? It’s closer is all.

            I’m hell bent to at least try since I’m here and have done all of the work.

            So, hoping Dubrovnik has a location. I have a flight to Zagreb booked if not, so…

            Fingers crossed and still would love your advice on that correspondence I received above.

          • Expat in Croatia
            November 25, 2019 @ 3:10 pm

            Hi Hope,

            You can of course try to apply in Dubrovnik, but usually non-residents must apply in Zagreb. You would need to go the administrative police station in Dubrovnik to try.

            Regards,

            Sara

          • Expat in Croatia
            November 25, 2019 @ 3:14 pm

            Hi Hope,

            If you have the option, I would try and apply in person in Zagreb. Consulates usually have incorrect information.

            I assume you are applying for citizenship based on heritage, in which case you are exempt from taking the language/cultural tests from January 1, 2020.

            Regards,

            Sara

    • Mtn
      December 20, 2019 @ 7:55 pm

      Hi Sara,
      My mom is Croatian, she left Yugoslavia in 1966 and married my father in Turkey. My mom has relatives in Croatia and small property also.
      She has ‘putovnica’ and ‘rodni list’.
      I am 52 years old and have Turkish citizenship. İs it possible for me to get Croatian citizenship ? Which documents do I need for application? From your website I understood to apply in Zagreb will make things fast.
      Would you advice an advocate or consultant that make citizenship application for me and follow the process?
      Kind Regards,

      {reply}

      • Expat in Croatia
        January 7, 2020 @ 5:54 pm

        Hi Mtn,

        Yes, under these circumstances, you should qualify for citizenship. The documents you would need are listed in the above post. I do recommend hiring an attorney to handle the process for you. If you email me, I can recommend an English-speaking attorney that specializes in citizenship.

        Regards,

        Sara

        {reply}

  2. Marnie Pate
    March 30, 2019 @ 7:06 pm

    My father was born in Croatia. I was born in Texas. My son has been playing professional basketball in Europe and would like to apply for dual citizenship. What are your thoughts? What are the odds?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      April 3, 2019 @ 12:53 pm

      Hi Marnie,

      If you can prove that your father was born in Croatia, then both you and your son qualify to apply for Croatian citizenship without having to give up your currently nationality.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Lucia
        October 29, 2019 @ 11:04 am

        Hello Sara, good morning
        I’m a big fan of you blog jejeje and i been reading your post about how to apply for the Croatian citizenship.
        I have a few questions about the process. Could you help with that? I tell you my story and leave you here some questions in case you can help me.

        My grand grandfather was Croatian and emigrated to Argentina when he was a kid. I’m Argentinian and would like to apply for the citizenship next year (the republic of Croatia voted for eliminate the lenguage and culture exam and now its easier for my to apply. This changes are going to be operative in 2020) .
        Now I’m living in Barcelona and to applying for the citizenship here, I have to do it through the Croatian embassy in Madrid with a previous appointment.
        But I read on your post that if I fly to Croatia I could go to a police station and I could apply there with no appointment.
        So my questions are:
        – can I apply in Croatia if I’m not living there? (with no residence stablished there)
        – it’s real that it’s so fast?
        – do you know where I could get Mi grand grandfather birth certificate? Because it is the only document that it’s missing in my family. He was born in Katuni Dalmacia. And I know his Croatian name and his birth dates.

        I hope you could help me or maybe refer me to a person who can.
        Thank you very very very much for your time!!
        Looking forward to hearing from you soon
        Regards, Lucia

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          October 29, 2019 @ 12:23 pm

          Hi Lucia,

          Thank you for following!

          It is recommended that you apply within Croatia as it will be faster. It’s unclear how fast it will be as it can vary, but it will be faster. You don’t need residence to apply here.

          Here are instructions on birth certificates: https://www.expatincroatia.com/how-to-copy-birth-certificate/

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

          • hope arnold
            November 22, 2019 @ 6:58 pm

            I just received correspondence this am that says that I MUST have residency to apply in Croatia.

            “No. You cannot apply in Croatia if you do not residence in Croatia. You have to apply in the country of your residence.

            Konzularni ured/Ufficio Consolare
            Veleposlanstvo RH/Ambasciata della Repubblica di Croazia
            Via Luigi Bodio 74-76, 00191 Roma, Italia
            Tel: 0039 06 36307627; 0039 06 36304630
            Fax: 0039 06 36303269”

            Help! Ahhhhhhh

          • Expat in Croatia
            November 25, 2019 @ 3:12 pm

            Hi Hope,

            You should be able to apply at the Zagreb police station if you are a non-resident.

            Regards,

            Sara

  3. Jerry Vlasic
    April 4, 2019 @ 5:43 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I love your site…very informative. I have two great-grandparents born in Vlasic Brdo and Restovo who emigrated here to the states many years ago. I’ve been able to locate their parish birth records via the Croatian National Archives. It appears I could apply for Croatian citizenship via lineage (up to 3rd degree), correct? I also understand the language requirement, etc., may be rescinded in proposed changes to the Citizenship Act. Do you know the status on those amendments? Thanks in advance.

    Jerry

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      April 9, 2019 @ 1:22 pm

      Hi Jerry,

      Thank you for following!

      I do not know the status. Once I hear, I’ll post on the Facebook page.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  4. ilya
    April 10, 2019 @ 11:37 am

    Hello Sara,

    I’m non-EU national citizen and will be getting married soon with my Croatian girlfriend.We are planning to live in at least 3 years in my country not in Croatia.

    I have 3 questions;

    1)Should we get married in Croatia? (for not to have problem and faster in future processes)

    2) Should we live in Croatia for become or apply citizenship Croatian?

    3) How long we shoud be into marriage to become Croatian citizenship by laws?

    Thank you in advance

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      April 16, 2019 @ 3:04 pm

      Hi Ilya,

      Thank you for the questions!

      1) If you plan to move back to Croatia long term, then yes, getting married in Croatia will make things easier.

      2) and 3) You as the spouse cannot apply for Croatian citizenship until you’ve lived in Croatia with your spouse with legal residence for 8 years.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  5. Mo Sayel
    April 15, 2019 @ 6:04 am

    Hi Sara,

    Great article! My father is a deceased Croatian citizen but I am not. I have proof of his citizenship from a Croatian court. I would like to apply for Croatian citizenship via a Croatian consular in the United States. Does that process also take 2 years?

    Do my daughters qualify for citizenship? My wife?

    Thank you,
    -Mo Sayel

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      April 16, 2019 @ 3:02 pm

      Hi Mo,

      Thank you for the question! You and your daughters qualify for citizenship, but your wife is not entitled to it. She would need to live here in Croatia with you with legal residence for 8 years before she can qualify to apply for citizenship.

      The process for you and your daughters to apply could take a long time, years possibly, if you go through a consulate. It will go much faster if you do it within Croatia.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  6. Valeria
    May 9, 2019 @ 10:01 pm

    Hi Sara,

    My husband’s grandfather was born in Croatia and lived there for some years. Is it feasible for him and my children to get the citizenship? We live in Argentina. Many thanks!
    Valeria

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      May 15, 2019 @ 10:50 am

      Hi Valeria,

      It is definitely feasible for your husband to get citizenship. Once he has citizenship, then your children should be able to apply since their father has citizenship.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  7. Sara
    May 18, 2019 @ 3:58 pm

    In 2012 I was living in Zagreb, and I inquired about getting my domovnica through my grandmother who was a Croatian citizen (I am a US citizen). The authority who granted my temporary resident visa said that it would take much longer to get citizenship if I applied in Croatia because the consultate was set up to handle applications more efficiently. Where did you get your information that it’s faster in Croatia as I was told the opposite, and am wanting to finally finish the process. Hvala!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      May 27, 2019 @ 10:11 am

      Hi Sara,

      I’m flabbergasted that anyone would tell you it’s faster at a consulate. All the stories I’ve heard of people applying for citizenship has gone much faster in Croatia. They were all stalled when going to a consulate. Regardless of where you apply for citizenship, it still has to go to Zagreb for approval. That being said 2012 was a long time ago, and a lot has changed. I recommend doing it in Croatia.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Sarah Crnec
        July 16, 2019 @ 4:22 pm

        Hi Sara
        Both of my grandparents were born and raised in Croatia. They had 14 children, 7 born in Croatia and 7 born in Canada after they immigrated here. Later in life, my father got his Croatian citizenship but is now passed away. Is it possible for me to get my Croatian citizenship without giving up my Canadian citizenship?
        Thanks!
        Sarah

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          July 22, 2019 @ 2:52 pm

          Hi Sarah,

          Croatia will not make you give up your Canadian citizenship. You’ll need to check with Canada if they allow dual citizenship.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  8. Diana
    May 23, 2019 @ 6:21 am

    The father of my children was born in Croatia and has current a Croatian passport and osobna karta. My three children are planning to apply for citizenship this summer while we are in Croatia. One of my children is 20 years old and the other two (twins) are 17 years old. Do you know if their father needs to be present when applying in Croatia or is submitting all of the paperwork sufficient on his behalf sufficient?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      May 27, 2019 @ 10:07 am

      Hi Diana,

      Their father doesn’t need to be present. They will need to provide proof that he holds Croatian nationality.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  9. Maria
    May 28, 2019 @ 4:30 pm

    Hi, once all the paperwork has been done… Is it possible to check the status online using the number they give me? Is there any webpage for that? Thanks!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 13, 2019 @ 9:07 am

      Hi Maria,

      There is no way to check the status online. You must wait until the police call you with an update.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  10. Mara
    June 4, 2019 @ 2:34 pm

    Hi Sara,
    Thank you for all of the info!
    My partner and our daughter are interested in becoming Croatian Citizens. My partner’s grandparents were both born close to Opatija.
    Questions:
    How much of the year do you have to live in Croatia once you get citizenship?
    Our daughter turns 21 on Feb 4, 2020. She would also like to gain Croatian citizenship and is currently living in Europe. Could she gain citizenship through my partner if he gains it before her 21st birthday?
    Thank you!
    Mara

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 13, 2019 @ 8:57 am

      Hi Mara,

      There are no requirements to stay in Croatia with citizenship. Your partner and daughter never need to live in Croatia with citizenship. Also, there are no age restrictions so your daughter can apply for citizenship at any time.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  11. Edwards Thomas
    June 5, 2019 @ 7:05 pm

    Hi Sara, Thank you for your informative article. Do you know if the language requirement has been removed as part of the requirement? Your article mentions it is been removed as of 2019. Thanks for clarifying!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 13, 2019 @ 8:51 am

      Hi Thomas,

      Honestly, I have heard conflicting information. I have heard that it’s already in place, but have also heard that the legislation is still unfinished. I’m working to find out what the truth is at the moment. When I do, I will update the post.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  12. Andrew Zacchigna
    June 8, 2019 @ 11:29 pm

    Hello,

    My Grandfather was born and grew up in Croatia. He immigrated to Canada when he was in this young teens in 1956, his Mother stayed in Croatia. When she died the Croatian Government seized the house and land more the 25 acres since no relatives lived there. He gets letters with the option to reclaim the house and land from the Croatian government.

    He finally decided he wanted to go through with it and wants to leave it to his grand children.

    In order to go through with this, would he have to get his citizenship first because of the laws about aquireing land as a foreigner? Or since him and his brothers still have a claim to it, it doesnt apply?

    Also, would he have to get his citizenship before his kids and grandkids are able to get theirs?

    Thank you very much in advance.

    We are planning a trip to see the property and are planning on applying in person for the citizenships because of the quicker responce time, which is also why i asked the above question.

    Andrew Zacchigna

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 13, 2019 @ 8:48 am

      Hi Andrew,

      It will make all simpler if he applies for his citizenship first. As long as all the paperwork is in order, his application should go quickly. He will need to gain his citizenship before any of his descendants can apply.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  13. Nikki
    June 21, 2019 @ 7:30 am

    Dobar dan! thanks for all the info !
    I will be apply for citizenship very soon as my grandparents were both born in Croatia but moved to England.

    Am I correct in thinking the biography is a ‘story’ explaining the the history of your family and why you would like citizenship?
    How long does this need to be ?

    Hvala puno!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 30, 2019 @ 4:34 pm

      Hi Nikki,

      Thank you for the question and your patience while I dug into this!

      The biography should include who you are, your link to Croatian heritage, what you do, where you grew up, if you are married and have kids, and why you want to be Croatian. The example I saw was a solid two-page letter.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  14. Ray V
    June 24, 2019 @ 3:24 am

    Hi Sara,
    I left Croatia while it was still Jugoslavija. I was born in modern day Croatian territory. Would that imply that I was born in Croatia?

    Thanks

    Ray

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      June 26, 2019 @ 2:48 pm

      Hi Ray,

      Yes, that would mean that you are Croatian. 🙂

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Rich Stefani
        September 5, 2019 @ 9:34 pm

        Hi Sara, similar to Ray’s question: My dad was born in Lussingrande, in the Province of Istria (at the time part of Italy), but now, modern day Veli Losinj. His family fled when he was 16. Although he has Italian citizenship and US, he’d like to retire in Croatia. Do you think he can get Croatian citizenship? Also, any ideas on how to go about this from the US? Unfortunately, the application is all in Croatian! Thanks, Rich

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          September 9, 2019 @ 2:28 pm

          Hi Rich,

          I suggest speaking to a Croatian consulate or embassy closest to where you life to start the application.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  15. Freddy S
    June 29, 2019 @ 3:57 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I’m from Venezuela, my grandfather was born Croatia and he immigrated to Venezuela, I requested an updated birth certificate of my grandfather which I already have in hand, I’m waiting for the Citizenship Act to be approved at the parliament so I can Apply without taking the test.

    Can I travel to Croatia as a Venezuelan tourist and apply there with my wife? I’m worried that it will take years to be approved If I apply here.

    What I didn’t understand is that takes longer if you are a third party national, does that mean that it will take the same amount of time if I apply either in Croatia or at consulate office just because I’m third party national?

    Thank you in advance,

    Freddy

    {reply}

  16. Zora
    July 17, 2019 @ 9:41 am

    Hi Sara,

    I am currently in Croatia as a student granted temporary residency. Both of my parents hold Croatian citizenship but were born in Bosnia and Hercegovina, and I would like to try and obtain citizenship while I’m here. Will this cause any issues?

    I’ve also heard that any required documentation must be provided and notarized within the past 6 months. Am I able to do this abroad for my birth certificate and parents’ proof of nationality?

    Also, the citizenship application link brings me to the MUP website, but I don’t see any forms on it.

    Thanks so much for creating this guide, very helpful!

    Best,
    Zora

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      July 24, 2019 @ 2:00 pm

      Hi Zora,

      Thank you for the questions!

      If you can prove that one of your parents have Croatian citizenship, then you should be alright. Best to bring their original domovnica. For your birth certificate, get it apostilled in your home country. Then bring it to Croatia to have it translated and notarized.

      I’ve updated the link to the citizenship application. Here it is for your reference: https://mup.gov.hr/UserDocsImages/Dokumenti/drzavljanstvo/obrazac1_stjecanje_prirodjenje_punoljetni.pdf

      Thanks for following!

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  17. James Gerbich
    July 30, 2019 @ 9:26 am

    Hi Sara

    From what I’ve read applying for citizenship via consulate can take two years if not more. If you travel to say a Zagreb Police Station with the necessary documentation do you think this would be a much faster way of getting it processed. (FYI I’m a New Zealand citizen but both parents are Croatian decent)
    Regards
    James

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 7, 2019 @ 1:23 pm

      Hi James,

      Yes, applying for citizenship within Croatia will be infinitely faster.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  18. Leonie
    August 5, 2019 @ 12:12 pm

    My grandfather was born in Croatia and I still have Uncles, Aunts and Cousins living in Croatia but my Father and Mother were born in Australia.

    What are my chances of gaining citizenship or at least obtaining a Croatian passport?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 7, 2019 @ 1:21 pm

      Hi Leonie,

      You may apply for citizenship since your grandfather was born in Croatia.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Leonie
        August 8, 2019 @ 11:23 am

        Hi Sara.

        Thank you for that information.

        Can you please tell me what the next steps are?

        Thank you.

        Leonie

        {reply}

  19. Mike
    August 6, 2019 @ 1:17 am

    Hi Sara. Excellent and informative article. I was born in Canada but my parents are both from Croatia who immigrated to Canada. I went through the process of applying for citizenship and recently (6 months ago) received my domovnica. My question is what do I do now? I was told that about an ID card the government gives to citizen’s (which I assume I can apply for)? Also, how long would it take to get a Croatian passport? Also, my kids applied for citizenship prior to me receiving citizenship (through my parents – their grandparents). Because of this, will it take longer for them to get their respective citizenships ( I received mine in 8 months). Many thanks in advance.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      August 7, 2019 @ 1:47 pm

      Hi Mike,

      Thank you for following the site!

      We are working on a post right now about the next step, which would be to apply for your passport so stay tuned for that. The national ID card is for residents of Croatia. Are you living in Croatia or do you plan to stay in Canada?

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  20. Hannah
    August 10, 2019 @ 3:49 pm

    My great-grandparents were Croatian, is there any chance of me being able to apply for citizenship?

    {reply}

  21. Dee Schmidt
    August 10, 2019 @ 4:35 pm

    Hello,

    My father was born in Split, however left Croatia to immigrate to Australia when it was still a part of Yugoslavia. He passed away in 1988.

    I am planning to submit my citizenship application forms at the administrative police station in Split when I visit in September, however I’m unsure about the language and cultural test component. When and how do I complete the test? Can I get information in advance to ‘study’ for the test/know what the requirements are?

    Kind regards,
    D

    {reply}

  22. Robert
    August 14, 2019 @ 12:54 am

    Hi, great article!
    Just a few questions regarding citizenship…
    I live in Canada, am 47 years old,
    Was born in Ljubljana to Croatian parents born in Cakovec where I was baptized. Emigrated to Canada at age 2 in 1974. I am fluent in Croatian, played soccer for our local Croatian soccer club, went to Croatian school, so yes, I am in touch with the culture! My parents both have their domovnice and I’m hoping to buy property in Dalmacija sometime in the near future for retirement. BTW my wife and I spend our vacations there almost every year.
    Just wondering would I be able to apply for citizenship through naturalization because of my parents though I was born in Slovenia? What documents would I need and is it better to do it in Croatia or a consulate which is not far from me here in Canada?
    Thanks

    {reply}

  23. Tony
    August 16, 2019 @ 2:49 am

    Hi Sara how do I find out if I am a citizen of Croatia? My parents were both Croatian born I was also Croatian born 60 years ago and lived in Croatia/Yugoslavia till I was 4 years old I have a birth certificate etc. I have been back a few times but never checked into my status I am thinking of going back in sept and was wondering where do I go to check my status.

    {reply}

  24. Dennis Coleman
    August 16, 2019 @ 12:10 pm

    Hi Sara

    I have been living in Zagreb for 11 yrs (not married and am from the U.K), I have a daughter (10 yrs) and since I have been here, I have never really been concerned with taking citizenship mainly because of the paper-chasing, costs involved and of of course the length of time it takes.

    After a recent visit to MUP I was asked “why didn’t I have Croatian citizenship?” which seem to make me think about it.

    Ok my question for you is, what is the advantage of me taking Citizenship?

    Dennis

    {reply}

  25. Eliot Zizic
    August 27, 2019 @ 1:48 am

    Hi Sara,

    My grandfather was born in Rijeka in 1911, prior to Yugoslavia, in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. I believe I am still eligible to apply for Croatian citizenship, and I do have a photocopy of his birth certificate. Is this enough proof of lineage? Is there a resource of birth records dating back before the existence of Yugoslavia that can be accessed in case they require further proof of lineage? Also, can I take the test at a consular office in the US, then actually apply for citizenship a few months down the road in Croatia and present proof of passing the test at that point, or does it all happen at the same time? Thank you so much!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 2, 2019 @ 9:32 am

      Hi Eliot,

      I recommend getting an official copy of the birth certificate. Here are instructions: https://www.expatincroatia.com/how-to-copy-birth-certificate/ You can also try to get an official copy of proof of citizenship. Here are instructions: https://www.expatincroatia.com/domovnica-proof-of-citizenship/

      Usually, you start the application then take the test for citizenship. If you plan to take the test abroad, you’ll need to take the test at an approved location. The consular office will provide this to you. However, my recommendation would be to do the entire process in Croatia as it will go much much faster.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  26. Andy Sterpin
    August 30, 2019 @ 8:40 pm

    Hi Sara,

    My parents were both born in Italy (Istria) before WW2 ended. After WW2 ended, they became Yugoslavian. In 1964 they emigrated to Canada and had a family.

    Would they be considered Italian or Yugoslavian or Canadian or Croatian? And if so, can I apply for dual citizenship?

    Andy

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 2, 2019 @ 9:29 am

      Hi Andy,

      Thanks for the question!

      You would need to contact Croatian authorities to check considering the uniqueness of the situation. My recommendation would be to go to a Croatian embassy or consulate to request proof of their citizenship. Here are the instructions: https://www.expatincroatia.com/domovnica-proof-of-citizenship/ If you can get proof of their citizenship, then you would qualify to apply for citizenship.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  27. Max Magdalenic
    September 5, 2019 @ 5:03 am

    Hello Sara,

    My father was born in Rijeka when it was under Italian rule I believe in the late 1930’s. I’m not sure if this is a problem for applying for Croatian citizenship? My mother was also born in a small village in eastern Croatia so we only need one parent to apply through if my father’s residence issue serves as a problem?

    Also, when my parents moved to Canada would they have been required to give up Croatian citizenship or does it matter as long as they were born in Croatia?

    Lastly, I’m not sure if you know the answer to this but if I do not speak with my parents anymore am I still able to request their documents like birth certificate, passport etc…without their permission?

    Thank you!
    Max

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 9, 2019 @ 2:34 pm

      Hi Max,

      You can get proof that your parents are Croatian citizens by going to the Registrar in Croatia. Reference the last two paragraphs of this post: https://www.expatincroatia.com/domovnica-proof-of-citizenship/

      I can’t speak to what Canada required them to do when they left Croatia.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  28. Wendy
    September 5, 2019 @ 6:11 pm

    Hi Sara
    Thank you for a very informative site! Please forgive me for the multitude of questions I am about to ask! My Partner would like to apply for Croatian Citizenship; his sister has already done hers, so we know he qualifies. We are in South Africa from the info read here I see it may be best to for him to do the application in Croatia, as he does not want to wait years for it. If he were to do this, what documents would he need, besides the CV, his Passport, his birth certificate and Police clearance? Does he need both his parent’s birth certificates and his grandparents, or only the parents/grandparents with Croatian citizenship and do we need to get everything translated here first. Should he do the language test before going over or will he be required to do it in Croatia?
    Thanks and Regards
    Wendy

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 9, 2019 @ 2:31 pm

      Hi Wendy,

      Thank you for following the site!

      The documents needed are listed in this post. He will need to prove his lineage, which can be done through domovnica or birth certificates of whomever has the citizenship closest to him in the family line. I recommend doing it all in Croatia: the application, the test and the certified translations.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  29. Zvonko
    September 7, 2019 @ 5:32 pm

    Hi Sara,
    I was born in Croatia and emigrated as a boy of 8 with my parents who were both Croatian to Canada in 1970. We became Canadian citizens in 1975. My question is at what point would I have lost my Croatian citizenship, cause I believe I would have been one based on being born there? At this point I’m considering moving back, I still have my parents house there, and I believe I need my Croatian citizenship to do that. I have my original krstni list and I believe the process should be straight forward. Can I apply for what ever status or paper work I need to acquire, while I’m still in Canada. I will be staying in Croatia for 3 months this spring, would it be advantageous to apply for anything at that time while I’m there? One last question! Could I just move back to my parents house and live there without reacquiring anything? Is this doable and what are the disadvantages of doing this?

    Thanks, Zvonko

    {reply}

  30. Mala Matacin
    September 17, 2019 @ 1:37 pm

    Hello, Sara.

    Once again, thank you SO much for this site–it’s been so helpful! You have a link to a form in this post (submitting the completed application) but the application is in Croatian. Is there any chance there is one in English? Thank you!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      September 24, 2019 @ 12:30 pm

      Hi Mala,

      The application is only offered in Croatia, but we’re working on preparing a translation as we speak. Stay tuned!

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  31. Dijana
    September 23, 2019 @ 7:33 am

    Hi Sara,

    I was born in Croatia and both my parents were born and lived in Croatia. I came to Australia when I was a baby on my mother’s passport. How do i apply for a Croatian passport?

    Thank you
    Dijana

    {reply}

  32. Sylvia Martinovic
    October 8, 2019 @ 3:20 pm

    Hi Sara

    My late father came to South Africa in 1938 and was born in Dubrovnik. My brother and I are South African born and have visited Croatia many times in the past and even though my brother is quite fluent in Croatian due to exposure, I am not. We would like to apply for Croatian citizenship. Is this possible and what will be required?

    Regards
    Sylvia

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      October 9, 2019 @ 3:03 pm

      Hi Sylvia,

      Everything that is required is listed in this post.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  33. Hugh
    October 9, 2019 @ 7:45 am

    Hi Sara!

    Do you have a sense for the average wait time to receive a domovnica? I have Croatian lineage through my grandmother and I applied for citizenship 12 months ago via a consulate in Australia but I’m still waiting.

    I’m about to move to Europe to study and I have a visa sorted but an EU passport will make getting a job post-study much easier.

    I don’t suppose there’s anything I could do to expedite the process while I’m over in Europe?

    Thanks in advance

    H

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      October 9, 2019 @ 2:58 pm

      Hi Hugh,

      To clarify, you are waiting on approval for citizenship. Then after you are approved, you can request a domovnica.

      Your wait time is not unusual. Since you are a non-EU national, it would not be unusual for you to wait a couple years for it to be processed. There is nothing that can be done to expedite the process. Wish I had better news for you!

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  34. Matias Kinkela
    October 17, 2019 @ 5:46 pm

    Hi Sara,
    thanks so much for taking the time to respond to all this messages.
    My mother’s grand parents were both Yugoslavian and emigrated to Chile after WWI.
    Her mother passed away.
    Is it possible for her to apply for citizenship? If so, would I be able to do so as her child?
    Thank you very much.

    {reply}

  35. Mirjana Ramesa
    October 18, 2019 @ 8:03 pm

    My parents home is located near Sibenik and I plan to travel there next summer. I would like to apply for citizenship during my travel. Is there an office in Sibenik or do I really need to go to Zagreb? My father is Croatian and I have his Domovnica to prove our lineage

    {reply}

  36. Jenna
    October 21, 2019 @ 2:18 am

    Hi Sara,

    My mother, A. Starcevich, has been digging deep into our family history and has been back to Croatia to visit our family’s home region. She is wondering if it’s possible to apply for citizenship through her great grandfather’s side. She is hesitant because she doesn’t want to waste a ton of her time, but she is also passionate about reconnecting with many more members of our family that are still in Slovenia and Croatia.

    To boil it down:
    -Her Great Grandfather George was born in Lic and her great grandmother Anna was born in Slovenia. George had 7 siblings, some of whom stayed in Croatia and within the EU, and some who emigrated to the United States. George and Anna came to America in the early 1900s, and had 8 children.

    -One of those 8 children was her Grandfather Anthony who stayed in Indiana, but she remembers him frequently going back to Croatia to visit his Uncles Pavel and Blaz. Her Dad (Anthony Jr) never returned to Croatia with him. She is concerned that her Grandpa Tony being born in America hinders her from using her Great Grandfather George’s citizenship. What do you think?

    Best,
    Jenna

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      October 29, 2019 @ 12:31 pm

      Hi Jenna,

      According to a new revision to the Citizenship Act, she would be able to apply for citizenship on the basis of her great grandfather. 🙂

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  37. Mark in Canada
    October 23, 2019 @ 9:39 pm

    Hi Sara,
    My father was born in Zagreb but he died 45 years ago when I was a baby. I was born in Canada. I recently was granted a tiny plot of land that the communists took from my grandparents, which would have gone to my father, but went to me due to his death. So I now have documents showing that I am a property owner in Croatia, despite it being just a sliver of land. I am a Canadian citizen and have never been to Croatia, nor do I speak Croatian.
    Am I correct that I could now apply for citizenship based on Origin? Perhaps the fact that I now own this property would make me a de-facto citizen?
    Thanks in advance for your insight!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      October 29, 2019 @ 12:27 pm

      Hi Mark,

      Property ownership is unrelated to citizenship. However, your father is Croatian so you can apply based on origin. You’ll need to prove his citizenship as part of your application.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  38. Sarah Radosevich
    October 29, 2019 @ 8:00 am

    Hello, thank you so much for the useful information. I am from the US, but great grandparents are Croatian and I live in the EU, so I would like to apply for citizenship. What documents are needed for “proof of nationality”?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      October 29, 2019 @ 12:23 pm

      Hi Sarah,

      Thank you for following!

      Your passport will satisfy this requirement.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Sarah
        December 7, 2019 @ 11:35 am

        Thanks for your reply. Sorry, I meant “proof of lineage”. Will I need birth certificates from my parents and grandparents?

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          December 10, 2019 @ 3:27 pm

          Hi Sarah,

          It would be best if you got the birth certificate for one of your parents. For your grandparent, you don’t need their birth certificates, but you will need to prove they are a citizen. You can get a statement from the Registrar stating that they are a citizen.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  39. James B
    October 31, 2019 @ 4:36 pm

    Hi Expat in Croatia!

    Fantastic site! Thanks for all the useful info!

    My question is ‘do we have any idea what the procedure will be for people claiming citizenship via a Croatian parent following the recent changes to the Croatian Citizenship law?’. I know that I have to do it within two years of 1 January 2020 – I assume that there would be no benefit in going to the embassy (I am not resident in Croatia) before that?

    My relatively simple situation is that my dad is a Croatian citizen (although now non-resident). I have access to his ID card and have his domovnica.

    Thanks!

    James

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      November 2, 2019 @ 5:52 pm

      Hi James,

      Thanks for following!

      The only difference is that you won’t have to take the test. You should start the process as soon as possible regardless of that date because it will take time to get everything together. Also, please note that residence is irrelevant to applying for citizenship.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  40. Bill
    November 4, 2019 @ 10:30 pm

    Hi Sara,

    Does the new amendment to the law on citizenship change anything for those applying by descent? My great grandmother was Croatian and I have been gathering all the documents to prove this. Would I still be required to take the test?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      November 5, 2019 @ 10:38 am

      Hi Bill,

      Thanks for the question!

      For a period of 2 years, starting from January 1, 2020, those applying for citizenship based on origin will be exempt from the test. We are working on an update to this post to reflect this.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  41. Jennette Borcic
    November 10, 2019 @ 8:11 pm

    Hi Sara,
    Could I fly to Croatia and apply for citizenship on behalf of my husband ? He does not have anymore vacation time.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      November 11, 2019 @ 2:22 pm

      Hi Jennette,

      Good question! He can either apply at an embassy or consulate nearest where you live. Alternatively, he could give you power of attorney to apply for him within Croatia.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  42. Tamara
    November 15, 2019 @ 8:46 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I’m living in Canada, was born in Bosnia. I’m looking at applying for Croatian citizenship through my grandmother, her birth certificate and her baptism document show she’s Croatian (however she was born in Vares (BiH) would this still count?

    Also, since I’m a non- EU national does the wait time matter if I apply in Canada or it will still be faster for me to travel to Zagreb?

    Lastly, can I give a family member who lives down there power of attorney to apply on my behalf, or I have to be physically present?

    Thank you in advance!!

    Tamara

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      November 19, 2019 @ 3:36 pm

      Hi Tamara,

      As long as you have proof that she is a citizen, then it won’t matter if she was born in BiH. The application will always go faster if you do it in Croatia, rather than Canada.

      Yes, you can give a family member power of attorney.

      Good luck!

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  43. Leo
    November 17, 2019 @ 7:18 pm

    My grandmother was born in Croatia. She obtained Croatian citizenship after Croatia got its independence. However, she lived in Serbia where I was born. Given political tensions between the two countries, do I have legal grounds for applying for Croatian citizenship?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      November 19, 2019 @ 3:20 pm

      Hi Leo,

      If your grandmother has Croatian citizenship, then yes, you should be able to apply for citizenship based on her citizenship.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

    • Philip Martinico
      November 22, 2019 @ 8:05 pm

      My mom is Croatian, she left Yugoslavia in 1968 and married my dad in Germany while he was in Vietnam war.My mom is still alive and has many relatives in Croatia and I would like to have citizenship to live.is that possible for me?

      {reply}

      • Expat in Croatia
        November 25, 2019 @ 3:11 pm

        Hi Philip,

        Yes, you qualify for citizenship based on your mother’s nationality. You’ll need proof of her citizenship and your birth certificate. All names will need to match.

        Regards,

        Sara

        {reply}

  44. Zeynep
    November 26, 2019 @ 12:07 am

    Hello Sara,

    Do you maybe have any idea of approximately how much time all the process take to obtain the Croatian citizenship ? I am a Turkish citizen married to a Croatian guy, i applied for the citizenship 2018 September and i am still waiting for it. I would like to know at least in which stage is my process but as you know i can not get any information.

    Regards,

    Zeynep

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      November 30, 2019 @ 4:01 pm

      Hi Zeynep,

      It can take 1 to 4 years to get approved to citizenship. I have a friend who’s father is a citizen and her application took 2 years. It is best to be patient, even though I know it can be hard. 🙂

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  45. Maria
    November 29, 2019 @ 8:54 pm

    My dad was born and raised in Croatia and half of my family live there but my mom is Norwegian.
    My dad now lives in Norway and holds a dual citizenship.

    Based on the fact that my father is a citizen, do I qualify for citizenship? Would it be possible for me to apply for a dual citizenship as well?

    What documentation would I need? Would I have to take the language test?
    Would it be possible to do this at the Croatian embassy in Oslo, Norway or would it be better for me to wait until the next time I am in Croatia? If so, could I do it in Sibenik or would I have to go to Zagreb?

    Best regards,
    Maria

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      November 30, 2019 @ 3:56 pm

      Hi Maria,

      Thanks for reaching out!

      Yes, you qualify for citizenship. If you apply after January 1, 2020 and before December 31, 2022, then you will be exempt from taking the language test. Yes, you can apply at the Croatian embassy in Oslo.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  46. Steve
    December 2, 2019 @ 3:17 pm

    Thank you very much for your website ! It’s a huge help.

    {reply}

    • Steve
      December 2, 2019 @ 3:23 pm

      I just red on the previous comment that “after January 1, 2020 and before December 31, 2022, you will be exempt from taking the language test”. Is that valid for me if my grand father is from (born and lived) Croatia ? Or do I have do I have to pass the test because I’m second generation ?

      Thanks 🙂

      {reply}

      • Expat in Croatia
        December 3, 2019 @ 8:53 pm

        Hi Steve,

        All Croatian descendants will be exempt from taking the test during this period, so yes, that includes you. 🙂

        Regards,

        Sara

        {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      December 3, 2019 @ 8:53 pm

      Thank you so much for following Steve! Happy to hear the site is a help to you. 🙂

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  47. Kevin
    December 3, 2019 @ 5:26 am

    Great information! Regarding background check, does any misdemeanor conviction impact citizenship application?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      December 10, 2019 @ 3:30 pm

      Hi Kevin,

      Thanks for the question! The background check is only for criminal federal crimes. Misdemeanors should not appear on a background check and aren’t grounds to disqualify you.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  48. Milo
    December 11, 2019 @ 10:41 pm

    I just received my FBI background check and a misdemeanor is present from 2013. Wondering if this is going to be a problem…

    Also, it was suggested that I also get one from my home state DOJ, as well.

    Thoughts on this?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      December 13, 2019 @ 4:42 pm

      Hi Milo,

      Croatia only cares about criminal acts, like felonies or worse. A misdemeanor should not be an issue. Also, you don’t need to get a background check from your state. The federal one is enough.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Sunny Gondalia
        January 5, 2020 @ 6:48 pm

        Hello Sara

        I am from Tanzania and I’m getting married to a Croatian girl soon this year, will our future kids become croatian citizen if born in Croatia or outside of Croatia? And will i also qualify to become a citizen of Croatia?

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          January 7, 2020 @ 5:33 pm

          Hi Sunny,

          Thanks for the question! Since your wife will be a Croatian citizen, yes, any child you have will be an automatic citizen of Croatia. You will qualify for citizenship after living in Croatia for 5 continuous years with temporary residency AFTER you gain permanent residency.

          Cheers,

          Sara

          {reply}

  49. mike
    December 13, 2019 @ 4:11 am

    Hi Sara, thanks so much for this. Really helped me a lot.

    http://eudo-citizenship.eu/NationalDB/docs/CRO%20Law%20on%20Croatian%20Citizenship_consolidated%2028_10_2011_ENGLISH.pdf

    Where can I find the new rule that states that effective Jan 1, 2020 that the test is no longer required by origin? The only article I found on internet was from last year in Dec that it was being proposed; but, nothing is final.

    https://www.croatiaweek.com/steps-taken-on-making-acquiring-croatian-citizenship-easier-for-croats-abroad/

    Which Article of law is being amended?

    Also, it was said “by origin” doesn’t need to take the test. But, in the law, the word origin is being used along with a “child”. Both my parents were Croatian when I was born in the USA. Is Article 8 and 11 apply to me?

    Thanks again. I am asking these questions since in a few weeks I will go to the consulate to apply and planning to spend my christmas break studying.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 8, 2020 @ 5:05 pm

      Hi Mike,

      For situation, it all depends on when your parents left Croatia. If they left before 1991 and went to some country outside of Yugoslavia, then you qualify for citizenship. If they left before 1991 and went to some other country in Yugoslavia, then that would negate your right to citizenship. If they left after 1991, they that would negate your right to citizenship.

      Regarding the test, it was removed from the citizenship act entirely so it won’t be mentioned there. It is valid from January 1, 2020. You can read the latest act here: https://www.zakon.hr/z/446/Zakon-o-hrvatskom-dr%C5%BEavljanstvu

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  50. Ben Marinic
    December 13, 2019 @ 10:07 pm

    Interestingly I was told by the Ministry of the Interior that the new Article 11 doesn’t apply to children of Croats who left Croatia for another European country. eg those with parents who left for places like Germany in the 60s and 70s – Which is my situation. I was told only countries like USA, Canada, Australia, etc are eligible. Which is a curious situation and I also don’t see this mentioned in the article and other sources I have read. Anyone know anything about this? I’m struggling to get any consistency from authorities

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 8, 2020 @ 4:59 pm

      Hi Ben,

      You were given incorrect information. If your parents left Croatia before 1991 and went to another Yugoslavia country, then yes, that would negate your right to citizenship. But if they left before 1991 and went to another country in Europe that was NOT a apart of Yugoslavia, then you do have the right to citizenship.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  51. Vladimir
    December 22, 2019 @ 10:50 pm

    Hi Sara,

    I’d like to ask about getting Croatian citizenship through my mom. Basically, my mom was born in Croatia and has a Croatian passport and Domovnica where it says that she is a Croatian citizen but when the war broke out she and her parents (also Croatian citizens) immigrated to Serbia where they received Serbian citizenship.

    I’m 23 and was born in Serbia, have Serbian citizenship, but live and work in Malta (as well as my mom and dad) and have a residency permit here.

    I’d like to know if I’m be eligible to get Croatian citizenship based off of my mom and what documents should I prepare and where should I submit them?

    Thanks in advance for the response.

    Regards,
    Vladimir

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 7, 2020 @ 5:51 pm

      Hi Vladimir,

      Unfortunately you do not qualify for citizenship. Even though your mom is a Croatian citizen, the fact that she left Croatia for another Yugoslavia country after the start of the war negates the right to citizenship for her descendants.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  52. Franciška
    January 4, 2020 @ 1:19 am

    My grandparents were from a Croatian ethnic minority village in Hungary (they’re considered Gradišćanski Hrvati or Burgenland Croats). They only spoke Croatian in the village while they lived there and only spoke it at home when they emigrated to the USA. I’m not sure when my ancestors actually emigrated from Croatia.
    Does that qualify me for Croatian citizenship? Is there any type of addendum for applying for citizenship as an ethnic Croatian minority?
    I thought I had heard about a legislation trying to be passed about giving more rights to people who identify as Croatian but live in different countries.
    Puno hvala!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 7, 2020 @ 5:39 pm

      Hi Franciška,

      Thanks for the question! Yes, there is a scheme (which is mentioned in the above post) about applying on the basis of being a “member of the Croatian people”. There is not much public information on this type of claim. I recommend consulting with an attorney to see what your options are and what you would need to provide. I can recommend an English-speaking immigration attorney if you email me.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  53. Joshua Cvrk
    January 8, 2020 @ 3:38 pm

    Hi Sara,

    Thanks for the great advice and effort you put in with your website, it is much appreciated and very informative.

    My question, if you don’t mind answering, is do you know of everyone who has applied for Croatian citizenship through they fathers side but only had his Yugoslavian documents? Birth certificate for instance.

    My father was Croat, as are my uncles, aunts, cousins etc who are Croatian citizens and currently live there. I was born in South Africa. My father left Yugoslavia during the early 1990s and never got Croatian documents as he passed away a few years later.

    Thanks again
    Josh

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 10, 2020 @ 1:09 pm

      Hi Joshua,

      Thanks for following the site!

      When did your father leave Croatia? If he left after October 8, 1991, then that negates your right to citizenship. If he left before this date and moved to another Yugoslavia country, that also negates your right to citizenship.

      Yes, Yugoslavia documents are fine, given that you qualify.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Joshua Cvrk
        March 9, 2020 @ 4:37 pm

        Hi Sara,

        Thanks for the reply : )

        He left before 8th October 1991. Also he never moved to any other Yugoslavian country. I was able to obtain his military registration records from the early 80s when he was in the Yugosav army and on it, it states his ethnicity as Croatian. Do you think this will help? I was also able to get a documents of my father and grandparents birth certificates and a letter from the B&H government stating they were Croatian. ( He was born in B&H but my grandparents in Croatia).

        Thanks again for the amazing work you are doing. It really helps reassure a lot of us who busy dealing with this. I have received all my documents that i need and i am applying at the end of the month once the translations are complete.

        Thanks again!

        Josh

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          March 10, 2020 @ 5:47 pm

          Hi Josh,

          Those documents sound like they will do the trick! Thanks again for following the blog and giving your support. 🙂

          Good luck with your application!

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  54. Nick
    January 9, 2020 @ 12:42 am

    Hi there,

    Was wondering if you are familiar implications on becoming a dual citizen in Croatia with regards to income? Do Croatian citizens living And working outside of Croatia need to pay local taxes in Croatia in addition to taxes they already pay where they are are citizen also?

    Thanks

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 10, 2020 @ 1:07 pm

      Hi Nick,

      Croatia only taxes residents on the income they make in Croatia. They do not tax you on your worldwide income or any income made outside Croatia.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  55. Freddy Valdiviezo
    January 9, 2020 @ 1:30 am

    Hi Sara.

    My name is Freddy, I’m 24 years old and I was born in Venezuela, currently living in Venezuela as well, the thing is that there’s been a lot of confusion since the new amendments and I would really like to clear the doubts.

    My Grandfather from my mother’s side was born in Croatia (Back then Yugoslavia) he escaped the war and came to Venezuela in the 1960’s unfortunately he passed away years ago but I do have his birth certificate recently renewed and everything.

    The last 3 years I’ve been really looking forward to obtain Croatian citizenship but there points that I don’t know if there will be a problem.

    *My mother does not have Croatian Citizenship
    *I’m also married to a Venezuelan (will she be able to apply for citizenship?)
    *My Father is from Ecuador and he registered me as Ecuatorian when I was born (Do I have to give up to my Ecuatorian Citizenship?)
    *Does the Croatian Language test will apply to me and my wife?
    *In Case that I qualify for the citizenship, can I apply in Croatia? I’ve been told that in Croatia is faster than in South America (Approximately takes 1 to 2 years here).

    Sorry for being too long in my comment but I haven’t found something really clear about my situation.

    Many thanks in advance

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 10, 2020 @ 1:06 pm

      Hi Freddy,

      Thanks for reaching out!

      Here are answers to your questions:

      *My mother does not have Croatian Citizenship >>That doesn’t matter.
      *I’m also married to a Venezuelan (will she be able to apply for citizenship?) >>Your wife must live with you in Croatia for at least 5 years continuously and she must achieve permanent residence before she will qualify for citizenship.
      *My Father is from Ecuador and he registered me as Ecuatorian when I was born (Do I have to give up to my Ecuatorian Citizenship?)>>You have to ask Equador if they allow dual nationality. Croatia will not make you give it up.
      *Does the Croatian Language test will apply to me and my wife? >>No.
      *In Case that I qualify for the citizenship, can I apply in Croatia? I’ve been told that in Croatia is faster than in South America (Approximately takes 1 to 2 years here).>>No. From January 1, 2020, non-residents must apply abroad at a consulate or embassy.

      You can have a lawyer in Croatia handle the entire application process for you. If you are interested, I can refer you to an English-speaking immigration attorney. Just contact me.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Freddy Marin
        February 22, 2020 @ 7:03 am

        Dear Sara,
        I had read that starting Jan 2020, you can’t apply in Croatia if you are not a resident?
        Best Regards,
        Freddy

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          February 25, 2020 @ 11:04 am

          Hi Freddy,

          Yes, this is true. If a non-resident, you must apply from abroad at an embassy or consulate.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  56. Kristina Jay
    January 10, 2020 @ 4:18 pm

    Hi Sara,

    Thank you so much for this very insightful post!
    I am a Canadian Citizen living in Zagreb under a Tourist Visa that expires in September. I just got all my paperwork together to apply for my citizenship, but I noticed your note that said as of 2020 non-residents can no longer apply within Croatia.

    Would that mean I could no longer apply while I’m here?

    Thanks,
    Kristina

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 14, 2020 @ 3:55 pm

      Hi Kristina,

      Thanks for following!

      You can certainly try while you’re are here. Worst case they tell you no. Thing is, usually during the process you get called to come back periodically so if you are only here on a visa, it would be hard for them to call you back if needed.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  57. Alexander Zidar
    January 10, 2020 @ 10:53 pm

    I am going to apply for a citizenship on Monday on the Embassy in Stockholm.

    My father was born in ex. Yug. (Now Croatia) and moved directly to Sweden. Is that any form I can pre-fill before going there? Found several on the website of the government, but don’t understand everything it says.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 14, 2020 @ 3:53 pm

      Hi Alexander,

      When applying at an embassy, they will have their own forms.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  58. Freddy Valdiviezo
    January 13, 2020 @ 4:36 am

    Thank you so much for your help.

    Just want to be sure on two things

    *About my citizenship I meant I already have 2 citizenship, one by birth which is Venezuela and the second one was when my father registered me at the consulate of Ecuador when I was born as well.

    *And about the lawyer, can I be present in Croatia through the process of application and everything or do I have to do everything here in Venezuela in communication with the lawyer?

    Thank you in advance

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 14, 2020 @ 3:45 pm

      Hi Freddy,

      From January 1, all people applying for citizenship who do not have residency in Croatia must apply from abroad. If you have a lawyer in Croatia, then they can take care of the process on your behalf from within Croatia. If not using a lawyer, you can only do it at an embassy or consulate.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Brand
        January 27, 2020 @ 11:27 pm

        Hi Sara
        Hope you are doing well
        I need some help with my situation
        Ive been married my wife for 3 years now and she is Croatian.
        Am I able to apply for croatian citizenship abroad Croatia (as we live in Montenegro) or I should apply inside Croatia.
        Thank you for your time

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          January 29, 2020 @ 6:17 pm

          Hi Brand,

          You are not entitled to Croatian citizenship unless you hold permanent residency within Croatia, which you cannot apply for until you’ve lived with your wife in Croatia with legal temporary residency for at least 5 years.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  59. Alexander
    January 13, 2020 @ 7:07 pm

    If it’s no longer a requirement to speak the language, why do I have to get all papers translated to croatian? At least resume and police records. Only got the documents in croatian too…

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 14, 2020 @ 3:43 pm

      Hi Alexander,

      Having the documents translated is unrelated to your ability to speak Croatian. The document translation is so that those reviewing your application in the government can read the documents.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  60. Mark in Canada
    January 16, 2020 @ 4:07 am

    According to the information above, it looks like only people with some disability may appoint a legal representative to make the application on their behalf at the police station in Zagreb.
    So just to confirm, I am not disabled in any way, so I am not eligible to appoint a legal representative or power of attorney to submit my application? I am in Canada, so if I do not need to book a flight and go there simply to submit my application, I would obviously prefer to hire a lawyer in Zagreb to do it on my behalf. Thanks for your reply.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 20, 2020 @ 1:51 pm

      Hi Mark,

      Anyone can appoint a legal representative for any process. If you would like a referral for an English-speaking attorney that can handle your application on your behalf, please email me.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  61. Ante
    January 19, 2020 @ 10:07 am

    Hi!
    I have a few questions!
    I am a Croatian with Permanent Residency of Canada and my Passport is expiring in September 2020. I am living in Edmonton, AB and I couldn’t find any specific information about how to renew my passport or where? Can I do it online? Can I do it in Edmonton or anywhere in Alberta? Or what would be the first step? Thank you in advance for any information!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 20, 2020 @ 1:40 pm

      Hi Ante,

      If you have an osobna iskanica then you can renew it through the e-Gradani application. If you do not have this chipped ID, then you can renew it at the closest Croatian embassy or consulate.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  62. Paul
    January 21, 2020 @ 11:23 pm

    Wondering if anyone here had had success with applying directly in Zagreb and shares the same situation as I have:
    1) Father was born in the former Yugoslavia (Herzegovina in BiH) and immigrated to Canada in the 60’s.
    2) 3 years ago, my father applied for citizenship in BiH and this was granted.
    3) My father never applied for Croatian citizenship, but would also like to.
    4) I can provide documents to show my fathers lineage and any other necessary documents. His family lives in BiH and Croatia.
    5) I have been told by an immigration specialist that I do not qualify to apply at all and a lawyer has stated that I do, then came back and said I most likely CANNOT apply in Zagreb.
    6) Every individual I have emailed wants money to just ask questions. I don’t mind paying for services, but not 200 or more euros to send someone an email. I am fully prepared to pay the “going rate” for services rendered.
    6) I do not have an embassy or consulate, where I live in Canada. There is one on the other side of the country.

    Options? Thoughts? Can you please share your experiences please and thanks! Very appreciated.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 24, 2020 @ 12:09 pm

      Hi Paul,

      Based on the information you’ve provided…

      If your father was born in BiH and left Bosnia to move to Canada, then neither you nor your father have a right to Croatian citizenship. As a side note, because you are a non-resident you would still have to apply abroad at an embassy. This is a new change for non-residents applying for citizenship starting from January 1.

      With regards to lawyers, they charge fees to respond to questions because it takes time to prepare answers to your questions, some of which requires calls to the ministry to confirm. Every situation is unique in Croatia, especially this one, and must be evaluated on their own individual merits.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  63. Julie
    January 23, 2020 @ 8:32 pm

    Hi Sara, do you know any information about the changes in the citizenship law (for children of parents born in Croatia). My father was born in Croatia (former Yugoslavia) and emigrated in the 1960’s. He became a citizen here in 1993 but now does not have a Croatian passport (although his current passport states he was born in Croatia). Does the new law apply to me? Do you know what I need to do for me to gain Croatian citizenship as information is hard to find. Would an English speaking attorney in Croatia be of use? I am in Croatia in April so if I can do anything while we are there, that would be useful. Thanks in advance.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 24, 2020 @ 12:04 pm

      Hi Julie,

      Yes, we have all the latest information on citizenship and the changes that went into effect on January 1. To accurately answer your question, I would need more information about your situation. Please send me an email and let me know when he left Croatia and where he moved to after he left Croatia. Also, did he give up his Croatian nationality when he got his new nationality, or did he keep it? Yes, an attorney is always recommended for citizenship applications. I can recommend one over email as well.

      Speak to you soon,

      Sara

      {reply}

  64. Mike
    January 25, 2020 @ 5:33 am

    In regards to Nick question about taxes from Jan 9 posting.

    If you are a tax resident, Croatia will tax both local source and world-wide income.

    If you are a non-resident, then Croatia only tax on income generated within Croatia.

    Also, if you are from USA, there is no tax treaty between USA and Croatia and will have taxed twice (aka, double taxation).

    http://taxsummaries.pwc.com/ID/Croatia-Individual-Taxes-on-personal-income

    http://taxsummaries.pwc.com/ID/Croatia-Individual-Foreign-tax-relief-and-tax-treaties

    Can you confirm this?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 27, 2020 @ 5:57 pm

      Hi Mike,

      Croatia will never tax anyone on their world-wide income. They only tax registered tax residents on income generated within Croatia. You are correct about the lack of a double taxation treaty between the USA and Croatia, which is annoying. BUT, I hear that there is discussion of putting one in place, but who knows what the timing will be on that.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  65. Oscar
    January 26, 2020 @ 9:54 pm

    Hi Sara, I have a question hoping you could help me 🙂

    I’ve gathered all the paperwork to apply for Croatian citizenship based on lineage. Two of my great grandparents were born in Croatia. You indicated in the post above that the names have to match in all of my documents. The problem is that when my great grandparents emigrated to Chile, their names were “translated” or changed into Spanish names. With that being said, my great grandfather was Ivan but in my grandfather’s birth certificate he is listed as “Juan”, then my great grandmother was Mara, but she is listed as “Maruja”. Do you think that will be an issue because there is really no way to change it.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 27, 2020 @ 5:55 pm

      Hi Oscar,

      There is a good chance this is going to be a problem. You can always submit the application anyways and see if they make a big deal about it. I have heard cases where applications have been denied, but I’ve also heard of situations where they allowed an application to be proceed (have not yet been processed yet).

      If they do say it is a problem, you’ll need to get their Chilean documents changed.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Oscar
        January 30, 2020 @ 8:51 pm

        Thank you for your reply!

        You mean the applications have been denied by the embassy?

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          February 7, 2020 @ 2:36 pm

          Hi Oscar,

          They were told at an embassy, and within Croatia, that they could not apply until they had their documents changed.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  66. Mike
    January 28, 2020 @ 4:34 am

    Hi Sara,

    In regards to Oscar post on Jan 26.

    I have an almost similar situation. However, it’s my parents and they are still alive.
    They have an american name from their Croatian name.

    Example:
    https://www.behindthename.com/name/d22urd22ica
    Durdica = Georgina

    I will be applying in a few weeks and will let everyone know if it works.

    I was told that I just need an “affidavit one and the same person” signed by person who has multiple names and a notary and then get it apostilled. This document lists all the different names and on which documents it appears. Like NAME1 is on Birth Certificate; yet NAME2 is on Passport and NAME1 and NAME2 is same person.

    Example Document:
    https://www.lawbench.com/sample-documents/affidavit-for-one-and-the-same-person/

    Have you heard anyone using this method?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      January 29, 2020 @ 6:16 pm

      Hi Mike,

      I have not heard of anyone using this method. I’ve heard of a situation where MUP denied an application for the mismatched name, and I heard of a situation where MUP said it was okay that someone apply with mismatched documents without needing any additional proof of the change.

      Please keep us posted on your situation!

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  67. Marko
    January 30, 2020 @ 7:18 pm

    Hi Sara,

    Thank you for the great site and feedback.

    One question: in addition to wanting to apply for citizenship myself (my parents are both Croatian), I would also like to apply for my children. On the Croatian consulate webpage, it appears as if there is a form that allows for adults and their children to apply at the same time.

    Is this correct, and do you have any information or guidance on how I should apply for myself and my children? e.g. should I apply together at the same time, or separately? And are the fees cheaper if I apply at the same time?

    Many thanks,

    Marko

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 7, 2020 @ 2:37 pm

      Hi Marko,

      Embassies and consulates have their own forms and fees. You’ll need to speak to the embassy/consulate where you intend to apply for see what is possible.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  68. Yuri Barac
    February 4, 2020 @ 4:41 pm

    Hi There,

    Wondered if you might be abler to help. I applied for Citizenship in August 2018 at the Croatian Embassy in London. I’ve heard nothing since and the Embassy says they don’t have any info on my application and to just wait to hear back as it is at the Ministry of Interior in Zagreb for processing. It’ll be 2 years in August and I’ve also changed postal addresses as I’ve moved.

    Do you no of any Numbers I could ring to find out the progress on my application?

    Regards

    Yuri

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 11, 2020 @ 1:22 pm

      Hi Yuri,

      Thanks for reaching out!

      Here are all the contact numbers of the Croatian Ministry of Interior: https://mup.gov.hr/contact-122/122

      It would be best to call the State Secretary for Immigration, Citizenship and Administrative Affairs and ask for help. His name is ŽARKO KATIĆ.

      Phone: +385 1 3788 646 Fax: +385 1 3788 187

      Address: Ulica grada Vukovara 33, 10 000 Zagreb

      If it’s not too much trouble, let us know how it goes! I am curious if they will give you an update over the phone. We are pulling for you. 🙂

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  69. Part Croatian Kiwi
    February 8, 2020 @ 5:26 pm

    Very interesting article thanks. My grandfather was born in Croatia in the late 1920s and emigrated to New Zealand in his early teens. My father (his son) who is half Croatian was born in NZ and now lives in Australia. I was born in NZ but now live in London. Am I entitled to Croatian citizenship by lineage.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 10, 2020 @ 3:15 pm

      Thanks for the question!

      Based on what you have provided, yes, you qualify for Croatian citizenship by lineage.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  70. Hannah
    February 12, 2020 @ 5:25 pm

    Hi, Sara!
    I am a US citizen my husband and his mom and dad moved here in the 90’s to escape the war in Bosnia. He was born October 10, 1991 in Bosnia Herzegovina. His mother is Croatian… his grandmother and uncle still live in Split. His mothers sisters moved to Germany. His father is Serbian. He doesnt know many of his family members on his fathers side but we believe they still live in Bosnia. We have two children ages two and three that were born in the US.

    It is possible that my husband could be deported back to Bosnia for some minor misdeameanors that occurred when he was between the ages of 20 and 23. He is all I have in this world and the love of my life and my childrens father. Also, he needs me just as much as we need him. Since he could be deported we are facing a situation where we could all end up having to move to Bosnia. Given the fact that Bosnia is still INCREDIBLY dangerous and most of the people he is closest to live in Croatia we are hoping we could move permanently to Croatia from Bosnia if this does happen. I should mention that my husband lived with his grandmother in Croatia after he was born until he was about eight years old, before he moved to Germany with his parents and then from there they moved to the US.

    Any advise would be helpful.

    Thank you.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 17, 2020 @ 1:24 pm

      Hi Hannah,

      Thank you for sharing your experience!

      This is a complicated situation, for sure. I would recommend consulting with a lawyer. I can recommend a great one if you email me.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  71. Camila
    February 14, 2020 @ 4:48 am

    Hi Sara,
    I want to apply for the Croatian citizenship since my great grandfather and my mother have it.
    I am an Ecuadorian, currently leaving Taiwan, but there is no Croatian Embassy or consulate either on Ecuador or Taiwan.
    I am traveling on April to France; therefore, I will like to know if I am allowed to do the paper work on the Croatian Embassy located in Paris or if I can do it directly in Croatia if I travel there?
    If not, where can I do it? I saw there is a Croatian embassy in Hong Kong and Beijing; however, due to health situation of the country I won’t plan on going there anytime soon.

    Thank you in advance for your help.

    Best regards,
    Camila

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 17, 2020 @ 1:19 pm

      Hi Camila,

      Since you are not a resident of Croatia, you must apply at an embassy or consulate. They usually say that it must be the one closest to where you live. However, I understand your health concerns with traveling to China. I recommend contacting the embassy in France and explaining your situation. See if they would take your application there.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  72. Angelo Labriola
    February 15, 2020 @ 2:51 pm

    Hi Sara,

    Many thanks for your very informative article and blog.

    My mother left what was then Yugoslavia (now an island of Croatia) bound for Italy. After some months and moving through various locations she emigrated to Australia in 1960. She later married in Australia to a non-Croatian. She was naturalised a few years later, not long before I was born.

    She does not carry a passport from her country of origin and the only paperwork we have at present is Australian-based documentation that records her country of origin, parents’ names, etc.

    Under those circumstances, is there any possibility for myself for citizenship of Croatia by lineage?

    Thanks and Regards,

    Angelo

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 17, 2020 @ 1:15 pm

      Hi Angelo,

      Thanks for reaching out!

      This is a very complicated situation. Croatia has rules with regards to leaving Croatia and where you go. Consider the nuance to your particular situation, I recommend consulting an attorney. They can confirm one way or the other whether or not you would qualify through your mother. If you want a recommendation, please email me.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  73. Eliot
    February 18, 2020 @ 1:03 am

    What exactly does “they must show they respect the legal order and customs” mean? How do you show that? Is there a test? An interview? Where does one learn of the legal order?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 19, 2020 @ 12:09 pm

      Hi Eliot,

      Good question!

      Yes, there is at least one interview, usually more. It is a vague requirement, but they really just want to see that you aren’t committing crimes, respecting the bureaucratic process and are doing everything they ask you to do. If you’re applying for citizenship, you’ll have to submit a CV, which is more like a biography that includes why you want to be a citizen so that will be taken into consideration for this requirement as well.

      Cheers,

      Sara

      {reply}

  74. Helena Van Den Heuvel
    February 19, 2020 @ 6:12 pm

    Hi Sara,

    Fantastic site and information! I am an Australian Citizen and my grand parents were both born in Croatia, whilst my mother was born in Australia and does not have a Croatian Passport. Unfortunately both grand parents have passed away. I was hesitant to apply for citizenship due to the language and cultural test as I doubt I would pass. I note that you said it has now not a requirements since 2020 (yay).

    Given this, If request the birth and death certificates of my grandparents and then use those along with all other forms,I think I’d be eligible to apply for citizenship? Also, do you know the time processes if I apply at an embassy in Australia?

    Thank you so much!

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 25, 2020 @ 11:14 am

      Hi Helena,

      Thanks for following!

      Birth certificates of your grandparents, your mother and yourself will provide proof of your eligibility. Really, you just need to prove at least one of your grandparents were a citizen and how you are connected to them.

      The time to process through an embassy can vary. There are a LOT of people applying right now, so expect at least a year minimum.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  75. Veronika
    February 25, 2020 @ 1:44 pm

    Hi,

    Both my parents were born in Croatia and left around 1958 to immigrate to Australia via Italy to work. They have both passed away now and my brother and I want to travel back to Croatia to organise property which my family has there and potentially move back to retire in Croatia one day.

    I understand we need to be Croatian citizens to do this and wonder if we have to pass language tests (as we have lived for decades in Australia so our Croatian is quite rusty). My brother was born in Croatia and he and my parents received Australian citizenship when he was very young. I’ve travelled to Croatia as a teenager with my parents but on what was a then Yugoslav passport as that was prior to Croatian independence in the 70’s.

    I’ve read on our local embassy website that there’s a requirement to show applicants have been directly involved in Croatian clubs and associations which we haven’t been involved with – as we really aren’t much into clubs and didn’t realise this might be a requirement. However, my cousin in Perth who gained citizenship said for people like us (who are direct Croatian descendants with family still living in Croatia) the membership of clubs was not necessary?

    Is it possible to have both Australian and Croatian dual citizenship?

    Thanks in advance for advice

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      February 25, 2020 @ 1:54 pm

      Hi Veronika,

      Thanks for reaching out!

      Being in a club or association abroad is not a requirement, but if you are part of those it is good to put in the CV requirement as part of your application.

      Yes, you can have dual Australian and Croatian citizenship. This case is quite common, actually.

      Please note that if you do not have residency in Croatia, you’ll need to apply for citizenship abroad at an embassy.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  76. Alban
    February 25, 2020 @ 10:30 pm

    Hello Sara,

    My grandmother ( on my father’s side ) was born and raised in Croatia ( i have her Rodni List and Domovnica ) she left Croatia in 1943 and married my grandfather in Kosovo ( Then part of Serbia and Yugoslavia ) after marrying my grandfather ins 1943 in Kosovo, they both moved back to Croatia and gave birth to my aunt ( their first born child ) in 1950, then they returned to Kosovo for the second time BEFORE 1960 and lived here for the rest of their lifes, and had 2 more children, one more daughter ( my second aunt ) and one son (my father). So i have 2 questions,

    question 1- is that with the new law ( article 5 ) you can get Croatian citizenship if one your parents was Croatian citizen at the time of your birth and the child was born outside of Croatia and that children over the age of 21 can apply within 2 years since the law enters in force, my father was born in 1961 in Kosovo and my grandmother was a Croatian citizen, so does my father qualify for the citizenship under this article ? can he apply to enter in the book of croatian citizens ? my father holds Kosovo Citizenship ( which became a country in 2008 and until 2008 he had no other citizenship )

    question 2 – this law also states that: If my father gets his citizenship then he would be considered to be Croatian citizen SINCE BIRTH – that means that in front of law he was Croatian citizen at the time i was born and i can apply through this article too ? is that right ?

    If none of these ways work, is there any way for us descendants of Croats who live in the countries who were once part of Yugoslavia to get Croatian Citizenship ?

    Thank you very much for taking the time to read and reply, sorry if i haven’t been clear enough but english is not my first language.

    Looking forward to hearing from you soon.

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 2, 2020 @ 3:22 pm

      Hi Alban,

      Unfortunately, your grandmother’s descendants do not qualify for citizenship. The reason is because she left Croatia and went to another country in Yugoslavia. In cases such as this, the right to citizenship is negated for the entire line of descendants.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  77. Veronika
    February 26, 2020 @ 6:58 am

    Thank you so much for the information.

    {reply}

  78. Kevin
    February 28, 2020 @ 6:44 pm

    Morning,

    Wondering if you can offer guidance: My maternal great-grandparents were both born in Croatia. My grandmother and mother were born in the US but both spoke Croation. When my great-grandparents and their siblings came to the US, they were instrumental in starting Velika Gospa in Chicago, which still occurs every year and is one of the largest such celebrations in the US. There was even a local PBS documentary on the Croation neighborhood in Chgo that featured many of my relatives.

    From what I have read in your post, it appears that I may be able to apply for Croation citizenship based on great-grandparent lineage and that there is also NOT a language test?

    Do I understand correctly?

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 2, 2020 @ 3:14 pm

      Hi Kevin,

      Great to hear from you! Sounds like you’ve quite an amazing family. 🙂

      Yes, based on the circumstances you describe, you qualify for citizenship. Since you do not live in Croatia, you’ll need to apply abroad from an embassy or consulate.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  79. nikolas hladin
    March 1, 2020 @ 12:57 pm

    Hi,

    I’m trying to figure out if I’m able to obtain my Croatian passport through descent. My grandmother was born in Zagreb however relocated to Australia. Neither my father or my auntie have Croatian citizenship.

    Are you able to shine some light on it for me? do I have some chance or am unlikely to suceed.

    Thanks
    Nik

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 2, 2020 @ 2:56 pm

      Hi Nikolas,

      If your grandmother was born in Zagreb and left for Australia, then yes, you qualify to apply for citizenship. If you don’t live in Croatia, you’ll need to apply from abroad at an embassy or consulate.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

  80. Eric Krzysiak
    March 4, 2020 @ 10:21 am

    Hi Sara,

    Both of my grandparents were born in Croatia but immigrated to Canada and the USA over 80 years ago. Yep, a long time ago! My grandmother is still alive and has all of the paperwork. I’m from California and was wondering if because my 2 grandparents were born there, does that open any loops of eligibility for me to apply.

    Thanks!

    -Eric

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 4, 2020 @ 5:13 pm

      Hi Eric,

      Yes, you qualify by both your grandparents! Since you are a non-resident, you’ll need to apply from abroad at an embassy or consulate.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

      • Eric Krzysiak
        March 5, 2020 @ 8:30 am

        Thanks!

        One more question. I’ve had a DUI in the past, 5 years ago. Will this disqualify my attempt at getting citizenship?

        {reply}

        • Expat in Croatia
          March 7, 2020 @ 1:41 pm

          Hi Eric,

          It depends on how the DUI was charged. You cannot have felonies, but misdemeanors are okay.

          Regards,

          Sara

          {reply}

  81. MikeP
    March 5, 2020 @ 4:07 am

    Hi Sara,

    I was told at the Consulate that if both of my parents are HR citizens, it is different application form and a smaller fee. Also, he said it will be faster approval process.

    What can you tell us about this? Is it true? Faster approval process?

    Thanks

    Mike

    {reply}

    • Expat in Croatia
      March 24, 2020 @ 5:15 pm

      Hi Mike,

      Maybe, it can depend on a variety of factors. A lot of people are applying right now in your situation due to the change in laws. People are waiting months and years. Considering COVID-19, there will be even more delays. I would go ahead and get started if you can. If you need any help putting together your application, I can recommend an immigration attorney. Just email me.

      Regards,

      Sara

      {reply}

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