Yet another 10 Croatian clichés to drop into conversation with a Croat

People sitting by the water in Skradin, Croatia

Clichés by definition are phrases that have been overused to the point of losing meaning. However, they are still a great way to quickly communicate a point that is easily understood. Some English clichés include “the grass is always greener on the other side” and “ignorance is bliss”.

The Croatian language has an endless number of clichés that are commonly used, so we’ve put together another list of the most significant ones. You can view our first post on Croatian clichés here and our second here.

Drop one of these into a conversation with a Croat and watch their smile grow!

Let’s start…

#1 Kolko para, tolko muzike.

Translation: How much money – that much music.
True meaning: You get what you pay for.

#2 Od jutra, do sutra.

Translation: From morning, until tomorrow.
True meaning: Continuously, without a break, always

#3 Tko radi, taj i griješi.

Translation: The one who works, also makes mistakes.
True meaning: Anyone who does something, occasionally makes mistakes. It is normal to make a mistake.

#4 Živi bili, pa vidjeli.

Translation: Let us live, and we will see.
True meaning: The outcome will be evident and clear after a certain time.

#5 Pas koji laje ne grize.

Translation: A barking dog never bites.
True meaning: A person who talks, argues, or complains a lot, will not carry out their threats.

#6 Tiha voda brege dere.

Translation: A quiet water tears hills.
True meaning: A person who is quiet may (usually uncomfortably) surprise you. Water dripping day by day wears the hardest rock away.

#7 Nema kruha bez motike.

Translation: There is no bread without a hoe.
True meaning: You have to work hard to be rewarded. No pain, no gain.

#8 Odijelo ne čini čovjeka.

Translation: The suit does not make a man.
True meaning: You cannot judge a person by their appearance

#9 Više štete, nego koristi.

Translation: More harm than good.
True meaning: To say that something or someone is…doing more harm than good.

#10 Nada umire posljednja.

Translation: Hope dies last.
True meaning: People will always have hope, and it is the last thing we may have.

View our other vocabulary posts

Please note: All information provided by Expat in Croatia is only for the purposes of guidance. It does not constitute legal or financial advice in any form. For legal advice, you must consult with a licensed Croatian lawyer. For financial advice, you must consult with a licensed Croatian tax advisor or accountant. We can recommend one if you contact us.

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